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Given the setup in the 54th slide of the golang tour:

type Abser interface {
    Abs() float64
}

type Vertex struct {
    X, Y float64
}

func (v *Vertex) Abs() float64 {
    return math.Sqrt(v.X*v.X + v.Y*v.Y)
}

Why can't a method also be defined for the struct as well as the pointer to the struct? That is:

func (v Vertex) Abs() float64 {
    return math.Sqrt(v.X*v.X + v.Y*v.Y)
}

Defining this gives the following error:

prog.go:41: method redeclared: Vertex.Abs
    method(*Vertex) func() float64
    method(Vertex) func() float64
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See also –  kostix Nov 18 '12 at 11:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

It can. Just define it on the struct and not the pointer. It will resolve both ways

Method Sets

The method set of the corresponding pointer type *T is the set of all methods with receiver *T or T (that is, it also contains the method set of T)

Try live: http://play.golang.org/p/PsNUerVyqp

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "math"
    )

type Abser interface {
    Abs() float64
}

type Vertex struct {
    X, Y float64
}

func (v Vertex) Abs() float64 {
    return math.Sqrt(v.X*v.X + v.Y*v.Y)
}

func main() {
    v := Vertex{5, 10}
    v_ptr := &v
    fmt.Println(v.Abs())
    fmt.Println(v_ptr.Abs())
}
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While considering for example:

type T U

func (t *T) M() int { return 1 }

var t T

...we can now invoke M() on t by writing t.M() as the language permits to call a method with a pointer receiver even on its underlying (non pointer) typed instances, i.e. it becomes equivalent to (&t).M().

If it will be permitted to now additionaly define:

func (t T) M() int { return 2 }

...then there's no way to tell what is now t.M() supposed to return.

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