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I have a Perl script which nests foreach loops as seen below. It takes a long time:

#! /usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my @sites = ('a', 'b', 'c');
my @servers = ('A', 'B');
my @data_type = ("X", "Y", "Z");

foreach my $site (@sites) {
    foreach my $server_type (@servers) {
        foreach my $data (@data_type) {
            #statements
        }
    }
}

Nesting foreach statements like this takes a long time and it's hard to read and not very pretty. Can anyone suggest a better way to code this structure using hashes, or some other clever structure?

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14  
There is no problem with the code. If you really want to do what you've written, then this is the way to do it. If you have something else in mind, describe that. –  jrockway Aug 26 '09 at 6:21
1  
For one thing, you have set warnings on twice. Either do it in the shebang line (#!/usr/bin/perl -w) or do it with use - you don't need to do both. I prefer use because it's scoped, but some prefer the -w, perhaps precisely because it isn't scoped, or perhaps because it's shorter. –  Chris Lutz Aug 26 '09 at 6:22
    
@jrockway: It works fine for me, but I am just wondering if I can have any better code then this. –  Space Aug 26 '09 at 6:28
3  
No, not really. If you need to work with every possible combination of values in three arrays, you're going to have to loop through all of them somehow. Might as well be a foreach loop. –  Chris Lutz Aug 26 '09 at 6:31
    
What problems and how can values mismatch? You'll get better help if you clarify what you're worried about. –  Telemachus Aug 26 '09 at 10:21

7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I don't see what your problem is, but you could use a generic Cartesian product if you are used to SQL or something:

sub cartesian {
    my @C = map { [ $_ ] } @{ shift @_ };
    foreach (@_) {
        my @A = @$_;
        @C = map { my $n = $_; map { [ $n, @$_ ] } @C } @A;
    }
    return @C;
}

my @sites = ('a', 'b', 'c');
my @servers = ('A', 'B');
my @data_type = ("X", "Y", "Z");

foreach (cartesian(\@sites, \@servers, \@data_type)) {
    ($data, $server_type, $site) = @$_;
    print "$site $server_type $data\n";
}
share|improve this answer
    
I might suggest that your cartesian sub be prototyped, so that users don't have to use `\` before all their lists. Also, ideally it should spit out the values in the same order they were put in. –  Chris Lutz Aug 26 '09 at 6:58
1  
Also, please use strict and warnings. –  Chris Lutz Aug 26 '09 at 7:01
1  
sub cartesian (\@\@\@) { –  Chris Lutz Aug 26 '09 at 10:21
2  
Even easier would be to use Set::CrossProduct, available on CPAN. –  FMc Aug 26 '09 at 13:40
2  
Don't do it that way: you have to create all the tuples in memory. :( –  brian d foy Aug 27 '09 at 17:17

Use my Set::CrossProduct module, or use Algorithm::Loops. You shouldn't have to create hard-coded, nested structures to deal with these issues. Both of those modules can do it for you for an arbitrary number of arrays.

use Set::CrossProduct;

my @sites = ('a', 'b', 'c');
my @servers = ('A', 'B');
my @data_type = ("X", "Y", "Z");

my $cross = Set::CrossProduct->new( 
    [ \@sites, \@servers, \@data_type ]
    );

while( my $tuple = $cross->get ) {
    print "@$tuple\n";
    }

Not only that, but the cursor gives you ways to move around in the iterator so you don't have to limit yourself to the current combination. You can inspect the previous and next combinations, which might be useful for boundaries (like where the next tuple is a different server).

Watch out for people who want to create all of the combinations in memory. There's no need to do that either.

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You could simply use for.

(sorry, couldn't resist)

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3  
I used to be a big advocate of foreach - I thought using for should be for C-style for loops, to make it easier to read for maintainers ("Is this a C-style or Perl-style loop?"). Then I realized that, in Perl, you almost never need the C-style for loop, and now I use it exclusively. –  Chris Lutz Aug 26 '09 at 6:59
7  
I think JB was referring to how "for" and "foreach" are synonyms. If the asker doesn't like foreach, he can choose to spell it "for" instead. –  Rob Kennedy Aug 26 '09 at 7:22
2  
Judging by my read of Chris Lutz's comment he understood that and was just relating that he used to reserve "for" for C-style loops and "foreach" for list iteration, then realized that he never needs C-style loops in Perl, so now he happily uses "for" exclusively. (And if that wasn't his story, it's mine anyhow.) –  Dave Sherohman Aug 26 '09 at 9:41
    
Don't worry, Dave, it was my story. –  Chris Lutz Aug 26 '09 at 10:21
    
In Perl 6 foreach is spelled for , and for(;;) is spelled loop(;;) –  Brad Gilbert Aug 27 '09 at 21:56

foreach is preferable because it's readable. What exactly do you mean by "each array can cause problems" (what problems?) and "values can mismatch" (what values?)

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nested foreachs are a pain to read and maintain. Use an iterator solution such as Algorithm::Loops or Set::CrossProduct. –  brian d foy Aug 27 '09 at 17:20
    
Looking at your comment, he'd have to download those from CPAN. Is it better to use built-in idioms like foreach, or force the user to download external packages? I prefer solutions that have as few external dependencies as possible. –  Shaggy Frog Aug 27 '09 at 17:52
    
The code for my module is minimal. He could even lift it. It's not at all preferable to use foreach since it hard codes its limitations. Other solutions are flexible without the repeated monkey work you have to do every time you change the problem. –  brian d foy Jan 5 '14 at 3:33

If I understand your question correctly then you asking how to use hashes with foreach to avoid mismatches that you would have in your array example?.

If so then here is one example:

use strict;
use warnings;

my %sites = (

    a => { 
        A => {
            data_type => [ 'X', 'Y' ],
        }
    },

    b => {
        B => {
            data_type => [ 'Y', 'Z' ],
        }
    },

    c => {

    },
);

for my $site ( keys %sites ) {
    for my $server ( keys %{ $sites{ $site } } ) {
        for my $data ( keys %{ $sites{ $site }{ $server } } ) {
            my @data_types = @{ $sites{ $site }{ $server }{ data_type } };
            say "On site $site is server $server with $data @data_types";
        }
    }
}


You can also use while & each which does produces easier code on the eye:

while ( my ( $site, $site_info ) = each %sites ) {
    while ( my ( $server, $server_info ) = each %{ $site_info } ) {
        my @data_types = @{ $server_info->{data_type} };
        say "On site $site we have server $server with data types @data_types"
            if @data_types;
    }
}

Also note I removed last loop in above example because its currently superfluous with my example hash data.

NB. If you plan to amend keys or break out of loop then please read up on each and how it affects the iteration.

/I3az/

PS. This example is not about the loop but about data being best represented as a Hash and not an Array! (though its not clear 100% from question that is so!).

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The only concern I might have when using nested loops is some ambiguity in what $_ is. Considering that you're not even using it, I don't think there's a better way to do what you want.

As a sidenote, I'd like to add that $_ is well defined in this case, but as a programmer I may not want to deal with the overhead of remembering what it refers to at each step.

Do you have any specific concerns with the code?

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4  
Uh, he isn't using $_ anywhere. –  jrockway Aug 26 '09 at 8:01
    
Which is why I think he should have no problems here. –  Nathan Fellman Aug 26 '09 at 8:10
2  
-1: "The only concern I might have here is use of egg noodles. You may not want to deal with the overhead of remembering what egg noodles have got to do with your code. However, since you avoid using it, you should have no problem with this code." –  ire_and_curses Aug 26 '09 at 10:13
1  
Right, except that egg noodles have nothing to do with loops in Perl, while $_ does. –  Nathan Fellman Aug 26 '09 at 11:02

You can use a classic for loop instead.

for(my $i = 0; $i <= $#sites; $i++){
    for(my $j = 0; $j <= $#servers; $j++){
        for(my $k = 0; $k <= $#data_type; $k++){
            do_functions ...

But that still leaves the problems and mismatches you were reffering to. I suggest you handle these issues in the do_functions part.

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3  
I'm pretty sure that code will skip the last element of each array. Better to use the foreach style, so you don't need to mess around with array indices. –  Rob Kennedy Aug 26 '09 at 6:56
2  
I don't understand why you would recommend a less-idiomatic, more verbose "solution" that's more like a mental speed bump to maintainers, and then say "but this doesn't solve your problem". If it doesn't solve their problem, or improve their code in some way, why are you posting an answer? –  Chris Lutz Aug 26 '09 at 6:57
1  
I edited this to at least be somewhat correct. Not that I would ever use <= in for loops starting from 0. $i < @array is much easier to read. –  jrockway Aug 26 '09 at 8:02
    
He asked what he could use "instead". Of course this is not as nice looking as for each but is an alternative. –  Ezekiel Rage Aug 26 '09 at 10:08
1  
This isn't really an alternative. It's doing the same thing with the same problem, even if the typing looks a bit different. –  brian d foy Aug 27 '09 at 17:19

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