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Possible Duplicate:
How does PHP avoid infinite recursion here?

Someone posted this as a php #wtf in Twitter:

class A
{
    private $b;

    function __construct()
    {
        unset($this->b);
    }

    function __get($n)
    {
        echo '!broken!';
        return $this->$n;
    }
}

$a = new A;
$a->b; //EDIT: original question had var_dump($a->b);

//output:
!broken!!broken!

My first response to this is that $a->b triggers the __get() for the first echo, then return $this->$n triggers __get again cause $this->b still doesn’t exist, which presumably the code contained in __get() is supposed to handle. PHP auto-detects the infinite recursion and stops there. This makes sense, but on the other hand PHP only gives an E_NOTICE error for the underfined property A::$b.

So my question is, am I correct that PHP auto-detects the infinite recursion? How could I tell? Or is there some other reason to explain the output given?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by phant0m, DCoder, markus, kapa, stealthyninja Nov 11 '12 at 19:11

This question was marked as an exact duplicate of an existing question.

2  
Looks like this post answers it, i.e. that __set() and __get() will only get called once, and that this fact is not in the manual. Still would like some confirmation on this though. – Anaxamaxan Nov 10 '12 at 22:50
    
echo '!broken!'; is echoed when ever the __get is called and it is called twice because you unset it, once when its unset and once when its from outside var_dump($a->b); – Lawrence Cherone Nov 10 '12 at 22:52

In the class the private variables are not hidden. So, in the execution of the below code you can get the variable $b, without calling __get():

class A {
  private $b;
  function get_b()
  {
      return $this->b;    
      }
 }

$a = new A; 
echo $a->get_b();

But in below one, you cannot - it will call the function __get():

class A 
{
    private $b;
    function get_b()
    {
        return $this->b;    
        }

}

 $a = new A; echo $a->b;

So in your example:

class A { private $b;

function __construct()
{
    unset($this->b);
}

function __get($n)
{
    echo '!broken!';
    return $this->$n;
} 
}
$a = new A; // Here you called unset, and since it doesn't know the "b", it calls __get().
var_dump($a->b); // Again here $a->b is not "exists" or "hidden", so it calls __get() again. 

In __get(), "return $this->$n" do know the variable $n - that is to say $b (Like in my first code example - the function get_b() ). So it is not actually the infinite recursion, it is just like any other function calling ;)

share|improve this answer
    
Why would unset not know about $this->b? – DCoder Nov 11 '12 at 11:31
    
Because unset is a global function. Not a class function. If you're trying to ask that "Why would __construct() do not know about $this->b?", it is because the b in $this->b is not a variable. __get must called to get the private variable $b ;) – mtndesign Nov 11 '12 at 19:39
    
construct does know about $this->b because private $b declared it, and the documentation says "It is possible to unset even object properties visible in current context.". If you add some more debug output before/after new A, you would see that both calls to __get occur after it, during the execution of var_dump($a->b). – DCoder Nov 11 '12 at 19:53
    
class A { private $b=0; function __construct() { echo $this->b; //unset($this->b); } function __get($n) { echo '!broken!'."\n"; return $this->$n; } } $a = new A; – mtndesign Nov 12 '12 at 7:30
    
Sorry, I ran your example with both PHP 5.2 and 5.3, and it didn't trigger __get when calling unset. I'm not sure I understand what you were trying to show. – DCoder Nov 12 '12 at 10:06

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