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I am wondering what are the alternative ways to avoid deadlock in the following example. The following example is a typical bank account transferring deadlock problem. What are some better approaches to solve it in practice ?

class Account {
     double balance;
     int id;
     public Account(int id, double balance){
          this.balance = balance;
          this.id = id;
     }
     void withdraw(double amount){
          balance -= amount;
     } 
     void deposit(double amount){
          balance += amount;
     }
}
class Main{
     public static void main(String [] args){
           final Account a = new Account(1,1000);
           final Account b = new Account(2,300);
           Thread a = new Thread(){
                 public void run(){
                     transfer(a,b,200);
                 }
           };
           Thread b = new Thread(){
                 public void run(){
                     transfer(b,a,300);
                 }
           };
           a.start();
           b.start();
     }
     public static void transfer(Account from, Account to, double amount){
          synchronized(from){
               synchronized(to){
                    from.withdraw(amount);
                    to.deposit(amount);
               }
          }
     }
}

I am wondering will it solve the deadlock issue if I separate the nested lock out in my transfer method like the following

 synchronized(from){
      from.withdraw(amount);
 }
 synchronized(to){
      to.deposit(amount);
 }
share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Sort the accounts. The dead lock is from the ordering of the accounts (a,b vs b,a).

So try:

 public static void transfer(Account from, Account to, double amount){
      Account first = from;
      Account second = to;
      if (first.compareTo(second) < 0) {
          // Swap them
          first = to;
          second = from;
      }
      synchronized(first){
           synchronized(second){
                from.withdraw(amount);
                to.deposit(amount);
           }
      }
 }
share|improve this answer
2  
This will work when dealing with more than two Accounts, correct ? –  user1389813 Nov 11 '12 at 2:12
    
I might not understand the concept well, but what about situation in which both accounts have the same balance? As far as I understand, they won't be swapped, therefore deadlock will still exist. –  Piotr Chojnacki Mar 28 at 14:16
1  
@Piotr: No, in this case you sort the accounts on something unique to them (such as an account number, or their primary key in the DB, etc.). The actual ordering doesn't matter as long as it is a stable ordering across all participants (i.e. no duplicates, as you suggested). –  Will Hartung Mar 28 at 15:08
    
@WillHartung Thank you Will, this sounds convincing! –  Piotr Chojnacki Mar 29 at 20:50

This is a classic question. I see two possible solutions:

  1. To sort accounts and synchronize at account which has an id lower than another one. This method mentioned in the bible of concurrency Java Concurrency in Practice in chapter 10. In this book authors use system hash code to distinguish the accounts. See java.lang.System#identityHashCode.
  2. The second solution is mentioned by you - yes you can avoid nested synchronized blocks and your code will not lead to deadlock. But in that case the processing might have some problems because if you withdraw money from the first account the second account may be locked for any significant time and probably you will need to put money back to the first account. That's not good and because that nested synchronization and the lock of two accounts is better and more commonly used solution.
share|improve this answer

In addition to the solution of lock ordered you can also avoids deadlock by synchronizing on a private static final lock object before performing any account transfers.

 class Account{
 double balance;
 int id;
 private static final Object lock = new Object();
  ....




 public static void transfer(Account from, Account to, double amount){
          synchronized(lock)
          {
                    from.withdraw(amount);
                    to.deposit(amount);
          }
     }

This solution have the problem that a private static lock restricts the system to performing transfers "sequentially".

Another one can be if each Account has a ReentrantLock:

private final Lock lock = new ReentrantLock();




public static void transfer(Account from, Account to, double amount)
{
       while(true)
        {
          if(from.lock.tryLock()){
            try { 
                if (to.lock.tryLock()){
                   try{
                       from.withdraw(amount);
                       to.deposit(amount);
                       break;
                   } 
                   finally {
                       to.lock.unlock();
                   }
                }
           }
           finally {
                from.lock.unlock();
           }

           int n = number.nextInt(1000);
           int TIME = 1000 + n; // 1 second + random delay to prevent livelock
           Thread.sleep(TIME);
        }

 }

Deadlock do not occurs in this approach because locks are never held indefinitely. If the current object's lock is acquired but the second lock is unavailable, the first lock is released and the thread sleeps for some specified amount of time before attempting to reacquire the lock.

share|improve this answer
    
I invented this solution on interview when didn't know the right answer ) –  BrownFurSeal Nov 11 '12 at 0:13
    
What do you mean 'sequentially' in the 1st case ? –  user1389813 Nov 11 '12 at 2:10
    
One thread holds the lock is computing and the other is waiting. After the first one had finish the job, the other will do the work. Both did not worked in parallel. –  dreamcrash Nov 11 '12 at 2:18

There are three requirements you must satisfy:

  1. Consistently reduce the contents of one account by the specified amount.
  2. Consistently increase the contents of the other account by the specified amount.
  3. If one of the above is successful, the other must also be successful.

You can achieve 1. and 2. by using Atomics, but you will have to use something other that double as there is no AtomicDouble. AtomicLong would probably be your best bet.

So you're left with your third requirement - if one succeeds the other must succeed. There is a simple technique that works superbly with atomics and that is using the getAndAdd methods.

class Account {
  AtomicLong balance = new AtomicLong ();
}

...
Long oldDebtor = null;
Long oldCreditor = null;
try {
  // Increase one.
  oldDebtor = debtor.balance.getAndAdd(value);
  // Decrease the other.
  oldCreditor = creditor.balance.gtAndAdd(-value);
} catch (Exception e) {
  // Most likely (but still incredibly unlikely) InterruptedException but theoretically anything.
  // Roll back
  if ( oldDebtor != null ) {
    debtor.getAndAdd(-value);
  }
  if ( oldCreditor != null ) {
    creditor.getAndAdd(value);
  }
  // Re-throw after cleanup.
  throw (e);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Atomics dont throw interrupted exception. –  BrownFurSeal Nov 11 '12 at 1:06
    
Correct! But I bet Account.credit/debit will throw something when OP gets around to that. –  OldCurmudgeon Nov 11 '12 at 17:42

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