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I have the following expression:

(list '* '* '* (list '- '- '- (list '* '* '*)))

I want to extract:

(list '* '* '*)

(first (list '* '* '* (list '- '- '- (list '* '* '*))))

does not work for some reason. Do you guys have any ideas how to solve this problem?

Edit: Ok, thank you! Now I'm getting my problem.

So my major problem is to produce a list that looks like:

(define a '((* * *) (- - -) (* * *)))

I am trying to break a morse code into several parts that represent letters. Each letter is seperated by a gap sign. My function for now looks like this:

(define (break-sign los sign)
  (cond
    [(empty? (rest los)) (cons (first los) empty)]
    [(symbol=? (first (rest los)) sign) (cons (first los) (cons (break-sign (rest (rest los)) sign) empty))]
    [else (cons (first los) (break-sign (rest los) sign))]
    )
)

It produces a list like this which is hard to seperate:

(list '* '* '* (list '- '- '- (list '* '* '*)))

I'm sure there must be a much simpler solution which returns a more useful list. I'm new to the language though and I would appreciate any help.

share|improve this question
    
Are you saying that instead of (list '* '* '* (list '- '- '- (list '* '* '*))) you want (list (list '* '* '*) (list '- '- '-) (list '* '* '*))? –  ಠ_ಠ Nov 11 '12 at 23:10
    
Can you also show some sample input for break-sign? I do not know what that function is trying to do. –  Chris Jester-Young Nov 13 '12 at 17:45

3 Answers 3

You have two options for getting the list '(* * *):

> (define a '(* * * (- - - (* * *))))
> (fourth (fourth a))
'(* * *)
> (take a 3)
'(* * *)

What's the difference? Consider this instead (same structure as your list, but different contents):

> (define a '(1 2 3 (4 5 6 (7 8 9))))
> (fourth (fourth a))
'(7 8 9)
> (take a 3)
'(1 2 3)

If you want your first approach to work, then the input would have to look like this instead:

> (define a '((* * *) (- - -) (* * *)))
> (first a)
'(* * *)
> (third a)
'(* * *)
share|improve this answer
    
Ok thank you now I get the clue :) –  user1814735 Nov 11 '12 at 10:37
    
However I'm still having trouble creating a function that gives me the list that I need for my "first" approach to work. I edited the post to give additional information. –  user1814735 Nov 11 '12 at 12:33

Look at drop-right and take-right
(define lst '(* * * (- - - (* * *))))

(drop-right lst 1) will return '(* * *)  
(take-right lst 1) will return '((- - - (* * *)))
share|improve this answer

With regards to your edited question:

(define (break lst)
  ; I'm defining a helper function here
  ; and it's going to do all the work.
  ; It needs one more parameter than break,
  ; and break has special logic for the fully empty list.
  (define (go lst group-so-far)
    (cond [(empty? lst) 
           ; Then this is the last group
           ; and we return a list containing the group
           (cons group-so-far '())]

          [(symbol=? (first lst) (first group-so-far)) 
           ; We extend the group with the element
           ; And recurse on the rest of the list
           (go (rest lst)
                  (cons (first lst) group-so-far))]

          [else 
           ; We know that lst isn't empty
           ; But the sign changes, so we cons the group we have on
           ; the front of the list of groups we get when we
           ; run the function on the rest of the input.
           ; We also start it by passing the next element in 
           ; as a group of size 1
           (cons group-so-far 
                      (go (rest lst)
                             (cons (first lst) '())))]))
  ; The empty list is special, we can't start the recursion
  ; off, since we need an element to form a group-so-far
  (if (empty? lst)
      '()
      (go 
       (rest lst)
       (cons (first lst) '()))))
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