Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

To preface this, yes this is a project to take control of an executable externally. No, I do not have any malicious intents with this, the end result of this project won't be anything useful anyway. I am writing this in cygwin on a 32-bit installation of XP.

What I need to do is change the first few bits of a COM file to be a jump instruction so that on execution, it will jump to the very end of the COM file. I have looked in Assembler manuals to find what the bytes of that command would be so that I can just hard code it in C, but have had no luck.

First Question: Can I do this in C? It seems to me like I could just insert OpCodes in the beginning of any COM file so that it would execute that instead of the COM file.

Second Question: does someone know where I can find a resource for OpCodes so that I can insert them in my file? Or, does anyone know what the bytes would be for a Jump instruction?

If you have any question about the authenticity of this, feel free to ask.

share|improve this question
1  
Add more detail on your platform. Do you really mean a 16 bit DOS "COM" file? If so, the instructions begin right at the first byte of the file. Just insert your jump there, and either parse the instruction you clobbered so you can recreate it in your stub or just hope that it doesn't matter. What are you trying to accomplish? –  Andy Ross Nov 10 '12 at 23:19
    
Yes I do mean a 16 bit DOS "COM" file. But was I asked was for specifics on "insert your jump there". That is what I cannot figure out. Do you have specifics on that? –  user912447 Nov 10 '12 at 23:23
1  
Have you tried googling "x86 instruction set"? –  Jim Balter Nov 10 '12 at 23:25
    
It's a valid and interesting question. Why does everyone downvote this? One of the better ways to learn about assembly and machine code is actually to experiment with this stuff. –  Nikos C. Nov 10 '12 at 23:27
1  
The Intel® 64 and IA-32 Architectures Software Developer Manual Volume 2A Instruction Set Reference contains the encoding of the JMP instruction (real mode is a subset of IA-32). For a 16-byte near jump (within the current code segment) you'd use 0xE9 followed by the relative offset to jump to. If your jump is the first bytes of the COM file then the offset will be relative to address 0x103. –  caf Nov 11 '12 at 0:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The Intel® 64 and IA-32 Architectures Software Developer Manual Volume 2A Instruction Set Reference explains the encoding of the JMP instruction (real mode is a subset of IA-32).

For a 16-byte near jump (within the current code segment) you'd use 0xE9 followed by the relative offset to jump to. If your jump is the first bytes of the COM file then the offset will be relative to address 0x103 - the first instruction of a COM file is always loaded at address 0x100, and the jump is relative to the instruction following the 3-byte jump.

share|improve this answer

On XP there should be debug.exe. Simply start it, start writing code with 'a'
type jmp ff00, and dis/[u]nassemble the result with 'u' if the corresponding hex dump was not shown.

share|improve this answer

Notice first that your program is necessarily operating system, ABI, and machine instruction set specific. (e.g. it won't run under Linux/x86-64 or Linux/PowerPC)

You could write in C the machine instructions as a sequence of bytes. Which bytes you have to write (i.e. the encoding of the appropriate jump instructions) is left to you!!!!!

Of course, that is not portable C. But you could basically do a memcpy with some appropriate source byte zone.

Maybe libraries like asmjit or GNU lightning might inspire you.

You probably cannot use them directly, but studying their code could help you.

See also x86 wikipedia pages for more references.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank your for replying. The part that you said is left me, however, is exactly what I am asking. A resource to find out what those bytes are. For instance, will an X86 manual have this information? I don't think it does, but I would love to be corrected. –  user912447 Nov 10 '12 at 23:48
    
Definitely, the Intel x86 instruction set manual do have that information, and both GNU Lightning and asmjit also give that. And the wikipedia page gives directly a link giving that information. –  Basile Starynkevitch Nov 10 '12 at 23:51
    
I am confused as to how generating assembly code (as asmjit and GNU Lightning do) from C/C++ will give me the OpCodes for a jump instruction. It seems to me like that is going in the opposite direction, I would need to know how to write a jump in C to get an output of assembly. –  user912447 Nov 10 '12 at 23:56
    
Notice that asmjit & lightning both generate machine code, not assembler code (like gcc does thru its cc1). And you also need to generate the machine code doing your jump. So they are related to your issue (the difference is that you want to generate a 16bit mode jump). –  Basile Starynkevitch Nov 11 '12 at 7:05

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.