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I'm looking for a function somewhere in Delphi XE2 similar to Inc() which allows me to add/subtract a number of degrees from a current number of degrees and result in the new degrees. For example, if I have a point currently at 5 degrees around a circle, and I want to subtract 10, I should not get -5 degrees, but rather 355 (360 - 5). Same as adding past 360 - it should go back to 0 when it reaches 360.

Is there anything like this already in Delphi so I don't have to re-write it? Perhaps in the Math unit?

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3  
For the record: Delphi XE3 does have a DegNormalize() function in System.Math. –  Giel Nov 11 '12 at 19:44
3  
I'd like to comment that this question, answers and comments epitomise why I love Stack Overflow. I've learnt a lot about one tiny little function that I thought I already had licked. Well played everyone! –  David Heffernan Nov 11 '12 at 22:35
    
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5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted
uses
  System.SysUtils,Math;

Function WrapAngle( angle : Double) : Double;
Const
  modAngle : Double = 360.0;
begin
  Result := angle - modAngle*Floor(angle/modAngle);
end;

begin
  WriteLn(FloatToStr(WrapAngle(-5)));
  WriteLn(FloatToStr(WrapAngle(5-720)));
  WriteLn(FloatToStr(WrapAngle(360)));
  ReadLn;    
end.

Produces result:

355
5 
0

Update:

As @Giel found, in XE3 there is a new function DegNormalize() which does the job. Even about 25% faster. The trick is to replace the Floor() call with an Int() instead, and if the result is negative, add modAngle to the result.

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+1 this is very elegant. –  David Heffernan Nov 11 '12 at 11:17
    
Thanks, I use it a lot in my applications. By substituting the modAngle to 2*Pi you have a working function for radians as well. –  LU RD Nov 11 '12 at 11:20
    
Indeed. Or pass modulus as parameter. My version seems needlessly complex. I think we use some of the helpers in other routines. –  David Heffernan Nov 11 '12 at 11:26
1  
+1, and deleted mine. Nice, and handles invalid values as well. –  Ken White Nov 11 '12 at 17:02
1  
@David: Thanks. Not sure what happened with the code (mea culpa, obviously). I never suggested that anyone (especially Marjan) broke anything; I just intended to point out that I actually tested the code. Seems I got things out of synch somewhere. (The point is a little moot, though, since I deleted the answer very shortly after making the edit this morning.) :-) –  Ken White Nov 12 '12 at 3:18
function WrapAngle(Value: Integer): Integer;
begin
  Result := Value mod 360;
  if Result < 0 then
    Inc(Result, 360);
end;
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This is probably the cleanest you can do for integer input. –  David Heffernan Nov 11 '12 at 21:50

The code I use to perform this task is:

function PosFrac(x: Double): Double;
(* PosFrac(1.2)=0.2 and PosFrac(-1.2)=0.8. *)
begin
  Result := Frac(x); (* Frac(x)=x-Int(x) *)
  if Result<0.0 then begin
    Result := 1.0+Result;
  end;
end;

function ModR(const x, y: Double): Double;
(* ModR(1.2,1)=0.2 and ModR(-1.2,1)=0.8 *)
var
  absy: Double;
begin
  if y=0.0 then begin
    Result := 0.0;
  end else begin
    absy := abs(y);
    Result := PosFrac(x/absy)*absy;
  end;
end;

function Mod360(const x: Double): Double;
begin
  Result := ModR(x, 360.0);
end;

This code will bring all angles into the range 0 to 360. For example:

Writeln(Round(Mod360(5-10)));
Writeln(Round(Mod360(5-360)));
Writeln(Round(Mod360(5-720)));
Writeln(Round(Mod360(5+720)));

outputs:

355
5
5
5
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+1: I can see your nautical domain background in this :-) –  Marjan Venema Nov 11 '12 at 9:04
    
@Marjan This code has been running in OrcaFlex for 25 years. The unusual comment style is because the code hasn't been changed since the days when the code was Modula-2! –  David Heffernan Nov 11 '12 at 9:16
    
25 years huh? Nice! And didn't even notice the comment style. I often use (* *) to copy paste stuff I'm working from, to distinguish it from normal comments and to avoid the non-nestability of { } comments. –  Marjan Venema Nov 11 '12 at 9:19

I don't know any, but I'd prefer using a more general solution anyway ...

Procedure IncOverFlow(var Value:Double;Difference:Double;Limit:Double=360);
begin
   Value := Value + Difference;
   While Value < 0 do Value := Value + Limit;
   While Value >= Limit do Value := Value -Limit;
end;
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Considering every formula I've ended up using takes radians, I tend to use DegToRad and RadToDeg. –  Petesh Nov 11 '12 at 0:42
    
@Petesh help me, I can't see the context to the question. Some API's use degrees, on the surface it's usual. –  bummi Nov 11 '12 at 0:52
    
I'm not knocking your answer; it's great for a general float-based increment function. It's just that RadToDeg(DegToRad(Value + Increment))) will give, more-or-less, the same answer (+/- the usual conversion errors) –  Petesh Nov 11 '12 at 1:08
    
I tryed this after your first post Showmessage(FloatToStr(RadToDeg(DegToRad(350 + 70)))); What I got was 420 ... –  bummi Nov 11 '12 at 1:11
procedure WrapAngle(var Degs: Integer);
begin
  Degs := Degs mod 360;
  if Degs < 0 then
    Inc(Degs, 360);
end;
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