Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The variable value in the initialize method of LocationList is populated in line 014. These changes are relected by the print statement in line 015, but the return in line 016 thinks the hash is still empty (scroll right to see return value after =>).

def random_point
  x = rand * 2.0 - 1.0
  y = rand * 2.0 - 1.0
  until x**2 + y**2 < 1.0
    x = rand * 2.0 - 1.0
    y = rand * 2.0 - 1.0
  end
  return [x, y]
end

class LocationList < Hash
  def initialize(node_list)
    value = {}
    node_list.each {|node| value[node] = random_point }
    print value
    return value
  end
end

z = ["moo", "goo", "gai", "pan"]

LocationList.new(z)
#=> {"moo"=>[0.17733298257484997, 0.39221824315332987], "goo"=>[-0.907202436634851, 0.3589265999520428], "gai"=>[0.3910479677151635, 0.5624531973759821], "pan"=>[-0.37544369339427974, -0.7603500269538608]}=> {}

Doing substantially the same thing in a global function yields the intended return value:

def foo(node_list)
  value = {}
  node_list.each {|node| value[node] = random_point }
  return value
end

foo(z)
#=> {"moo"=>[-0.33410735869573926, -0.4087709899603238], "goo"=>[0.6093966465651919, 0.6349767372996336], "gai"=>[0.718925625951371, -0.6726652512124924], "pan"=>[0.08604969147566277, -0.518636160280254]}
share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by sawa, Richard Harrison, Rimian, lserni, alestanis Nov 11 '12 at 11:01

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
The initialize method is not supposed to return any value. Store the hash in an instance variable instead and read it after instantiating the object. –  toniedzwiedz Nov 11 '12 at 1:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You're creating a new Hash that you call value in your initialize method, rather than initializing self. Illustrating this inline:

class LocationList < Hash
  def initialize(node_list)
    # self is already a LocationList, which is a Hash

    value={}
    # value is now a new Hash

    node_list.each {|node| value[node]=random_point}
    # value now has keys set

    return value
    # value is now discarded
    # LocationList.new returns the constructed object; it does not return
    # the result of LocationList#initialize
  end
end

Try this instead:

class LocationList < Hash
  def initialize(node_list)
    node_list.each {|node| self[node]=random_point}
  end
end
share|improve this answer

Note that you're not actually calling initialize, you're calling new, which then calls initialize. new throws away the return value of initialize, and instead always returns the object that was just created. This can be seen rather clearly in the implementation of Class#new.

Since you're already in the Hash you want, don't create another hash (value), simply use the one you're in (self)! This reduces your initialize to:

def initialize(node_list)
  node_list.each { |node| self[node] = random_point }
end
share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.