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I'm not asking for code I'm asking for help. yes it is for a project for class.

Program reads a .txt file that contains something like this,

  • NOT 10100110
  • AND 00111101

Program needs to read the operator and perform a function according to that operator to alter the byte. Then output the altered byte.

What I know how to do:

  • Open the file up.
  • read from the file.
  • I can store the byte in an array.

What I need help with:

  • Reading the operator (AND, OR, NOT)
  • Store each bit inside an array (I can store the byte but not the bit)

My code:

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <istream>
#include <cctype>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
const int SIZE = 8;
int numbers[SIZE]; // C array? to hold our words we read in
int bit;

std::cout << "Read from a file!" << std::endl;

std::ifstream fin("small.txt");


for (int i = 0; (fin >> bit) && (i < SIZE); ++i) 
{                                            
cout << "The number is: " << bit << endl;
numbers[i] = bit;

} 

fin.close();
return 0;
}
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What does that print? –  alestanis Nov 11 '12 at 1:02
    
You're doing fin >> bit where bit is uninitialized. –  0x499602D2 Nov 11 '12 at 1:07
    
@David: yeah, so? –  Beta Nov 11 '12 at 1:15
    
If I alter the file to start with a byte like, "10110100" it prints that and that is all. Otherwise it prints nothing. –  user1509151 Nov 11 '12 at 1:16
    
You can read the operator in as a string. And you have to decide whether to read the rest as a string or as several char. If your text file contains a sequence of digits, and you try to read that into an int, you'll get e.g. ten million one hundred ten thousand one hundred. –  Beta Nov 11 '12 at 1:22

1 Answer 1

First of all: change int numbers[SIZE]; to std::vector<int> numbers(SIZE);. (#include <vector>)

Second: I have only seen ifstream like this:

std::ifstream ifs;
ifs.open("small.txt");

Third, and this is my answer:

You forgot to read the operator, try:

#include <string>
#include <vector>

int main()
{
using namespace std; // better inside than outside not to cause name clash.

const int SIZE = 8;
vector<int> numbers(SIZE);

ifstream ifs;
ifs.open("small.txt");
if(!ifs.is_open())
{    
  cerr<< "Could not open file"<<endl;
  abort();
}

string operator_name;
for (int i = 0; !ifs.eof() && (i < SIZE); ++i) 
{                                            
  ifs >> operator >> bit;
  cout << "The operator is" << operator_name <<endl;
  cout << "The number is: " << bit << endl;
  numbers[i] = bit;
}
ifs.close(); // although ifs should manage it by itself, that is what classes are for, aren't they?
return 0;
}
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