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I am working on a web-based log management system that will be built on the Grails framework and I am going to use one of the text processing languages like Python or Perl. I have created Python and Perl scripts that load log files and parse each line to save them to a MySQL database (the file contains about 40,000 lines, about 7MB). It took 1 min 2 secs using Perl and only 17 secs using Python. I had supposed that Perl would be faster than Python, as Perl is the original text processing language (my suspicions also coming from different blogs where I was reading about Perl text processing performance). Also I was not expecting a 47 second difference between Perl and Python. Why is Perl taking more time than Python to process my log file? Is it because I am using some wrong db module or my code and regular expression for Perl can be improved?

Note: I am a Java and Groovy developer and I have no experience with Perl (I am using Strawberry Perl v5.16). Also I have made this test with Java (1 min 5 secs) and Groovy (1 min 7 secs) but more than 1 min to process the log file is too much, so both languages are out and now I want to choose between Perl and Python.

PERL Code

use DBI;
use DBD::mysql;
# make connection to database
$connection = DBI->connect("dbi:mysql:logs:localhost:3306","root","") || die      "Cannot connect: $DBI::errstr";

# set the value of your SQL query
$query = "insert into logs (line_number, dated, time_stamp, thread, level, logger, user, message)
        values (?, ?, ?, ?, ?, ?, ?, ?) ";

# prepare your statement for connecting to the database
$statement = $connection->prepare($query); 

$runningTime = time;

# open text file
open (LOG,'catalina2.txt') || die "Cannot read logfile!\n";;

while (<LOG>) {
    my ($date, $time, $thread, $level, $logger, $user, $message) = /^(\d{4}-\d{2}-\d{2}) (\d{2}:\d{2}:\d{2},\d{3}) (\[.*\]) (.*) (\S*) (\(.*\)) - (.*)$/;

    $statement->execute(1, $date, $time, $thread, $level, $logger, $user, $message);
}  

# close the open text file
close(LOG);

# close database connection
$connection->disconnect;

$runningTime = time - $runningTime;
printf("\n\nTotal running time: %02d:%02d:%02d\n\n", int($runningTime / 3600),   int(($runningTime % 3600) / 60), int($runningTime % 60));

# exit the script
exit;

PYTHON Code

import re
import mysql.connector
import time

file = open("D:\catalina2.txt","r")
rexp = re.compile('^(\d{4}-\d{2}-\d{2}) (\d{2}:\d{2}:\d{2},\d{3}) (\[.*\]) (.*) (\S*) (\(.*\)) - (.*)$')
conn = mysql.connector.connect(user='root',host='localhost',database='logs')
cursor = conn.cursor()

tic = time.clock()

increment  = 1
for text in file.readlines():
    match = rexp.match(text)
    increment +=  1
cursor.execute('insert into logs (line_number,dated, time_stamp, thread,level,logger,user,message ) values (%s,%s,%s,%s,%s,%s,%s,%s)', (increment, match.group(1), match.group(2),match.group(3),match.group(4),match.group(5),match.group(6),match.group(7)))

conn.commit()
cursor.close()
conn.close()

toc = time.clock()
print "Total time: %s" % (toc - tic)
share|improve this question
    
Perl is faster in text processing does not mean it is faster in database querying. –  texasbruce Nov 11 '12 at 1:25
1  
Even so, @Martin M is also using DFA-based regexp compilation in Python, but then not taking advantage of the same (re::engine::re2) in Perl. –  David-SkyMesh Nov 11 '12 at 1:26
    
In general these things are very hard to compare, especially on a single instance of data and on the time scale you are looking at. –  Bitwise Nov 11 '12 at 1:55
1  
@David-SkyMesh Uhmm, Python doesn't implement anything like that unless you use a 3rd-party library like re2 or TRE. Also see this site. The implementation did not change dramatically since 2.4. –  lqc Nov 11 '12 at 2:05
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closed as not a real question by JBernardo, amon, Ryan Bigg, LB40, Richard Harrison Nov 11 '12 at 8:58

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1 Answer

It is not a fair comparison:

You are only calling cursor.execute once in Python:

for text in file.readlines():
    match = rexp.match(text)
    increment +=  1
cursor.execute('insert into logs (line_number,dated, time_stamp, thread,level,logger,user,message ) values (%s,%s,%s,%s,%s,%s,%s,%s)', (increment, match.group(1), match.group(2),match.group(3),match.group(4),match.group(5),match.group(6),match.group(7)))

But you are calling $statement->execute many times in Perl:

while (<LOG>) {
    my ($date, $time, $thread, $level, $logger, $user, $message) = /^(\d{4}-\d{2}-\d{2}) (\d{2}:\d{2}:\d{2},\d{3}) (\[.*\]) (.*) (\S*) (\(.*\)) - (.*)$/;

    $statement->execute(1, $date, $time, $thread, $level, $logger, $user, $message);
}  

By the way, for the Python version, calling cursor.execute once for every row will be slow. You can make it faster by using cursor.executemany:

sql = 'insert into logs (line_number,dated, time_stamp, thread,level,logger,user,message ) values (%s,%s,%s,%s,%s,%s,%s,%s)'
args = []
for text in file:
    match = rexp.match(text)
    increment +=  1
    args.append([increment] + list(match.groups()))

cursor.executemany(sql, args)

If there are too many lines in the log file, you may need to break this up into blocks:

args = []
for text in file:
    match = rexp.match(text)
    increment +=  1
    args.append([increment] + list(match.groups()))
    if increment % 1000 == 0:
        cursor.executemany(sql, args)
        args = []
if args:
    cursor.executemany(sql, args)    

(Also, don't use file.readlines() because this creates a list (which may be huge). file is an iterator which spits out one line at a time, so for text in file suffices.)

share|improve this answer
2  
You'd think he'd notice the difference in number of rows inserted. :-) A typo in his post? –  David-SkyMesh Nov 11 '12 at 1:27
    
I thought its OP's typo... –  texasbruce Nov 11 '12 at 1:27
2  
But it actually makes sense though. Python cannot be this faster than Java and Perl' –  texasbruce Nov 11 '12 at 1:28
    
I still recon it'll be the different regexp engines being used. (ie: the slower, general-purpose Perl engine, versus the faster Python DFA-based engine). use re::engine::re2; in the Perl one and it'll be fairer. –  David-SkyMesh Nov 11 '12 at 1:30
2  
@David Python allows backtracking just as perl does, so there are no conceptual differences between the two engines (and that also excludes python using a DFA for its implementation - or does it first check whether the regex is really a regular expression and chooses based on that?) and I'd assume that the perl one is much more optimized. The number of execute calls sounds like the much more realistic reason. –  Voo Nov 11 '12 at 1:35
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