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For the sake of demonstration, I have created this simple console application:

#include <iostream>

class Person {
public:
    int mAge;
};

int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{
    Person *iPerson = new Person();
    iPerson->mAge = 15;

    std::cout << "Age: " << iPerson->mAge;
    return 0;
}

Now I'm aware that Valgrind and CPP Check will identify leaks here, but testing Apple's Instruments, When I profile this code I can't see any leaks. This is despite iPerson never being deleted.

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On my machine valgrind correctly detects "definitely lost: 4 bytes in 1 blocks"... –  Matteo Italia Nov 11 '12 at 1:56
    
What programs are you using? One doesn't even need a tool to see the leak... –  MFH Nov 11 '12 at 2:54
1  
@MFH - This is actually a simple case to demonstrate the fact that I don't get anything for objects that are not deleted. The actual problem involves a rather big framework and a test app. Because I don't get memory leaks for objects the test app does not delete, I also don't get memory leaks for the objects composed within these app objects, and so forth. I don't really see the point submitting hundrads of code lines, when the issue can be demonstrated with a dozen. –  Izhaki Nov 11 '12 at 3:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Leaks Instrument performs snapshots at a predefined frequency. By default, that value is "every 10 seconds". You program completes before 10 seconds. Thus, the leak is never collected. So you must suspend execution after iPerson has gone out of scope in order for that leak to be detected. Also, if you just add a sleep while that pointer is still referenced on the stack or in a register, then it won't be a leak.

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You could have a look at Tips for Improving Leak Detection from the Mac Developer Library.

Cppcheck static analysis tool for C/C++ code might also help. For the example you provided, it finds:

#>cppcheck  so_code.cpp
Checking so_code.cpp...
[so_code.cpp:15]: (error) Memory leak: iPerson
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I've worked it out:

  • I had to set the snapshot interval to 1 second.
  • I had to disable (set to None) Optimization for the release version (for which profiling is done).

Then based on justin's reply and this question, I had to modify my code like so:

#include <iostream>
#include <unistd.h>

class Person {
public:
    int mAge;
};

void CreateLeaks()
{
    // All three lines will generate a leak.
    Person *iPerson = new Person();
    iPerson = new Person();
    iPerson = new Person();
}

int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{
    CreateLeaks();

    sleep( 2 );
    return 0;
}

There are still some odd things going on. For example, if you start adding sleep(2) within CreateLeaks, Instruments doesn't catch all leaks (depending on where you put the sleep commands. Odd.

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