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Why does my code not accept the argv[] string? What do I need to do to fix it? I want to be able to type in both lower and upper case letters and end up with only lowercase letters in the array. Thanks for any help.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>  
#include <ctype.h>

int main(int argc, char argv[])
{

  char word[30]= atoi(argv[1]);  // here is the input
  for (int i = 0; word[i]; i++)
    word[i] = tolower(word[i]);

  printf("Here is the new word: %s\n", word);
  return 0;
}
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2 Answers 2

int main(int argc, char argv[])

should be:

int main(int argc, char *argv[])

Besides, strtol is a better option than atoi as strtol can handle failures better.

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My comment is out of the scope of question, but thought to mention it. If you try to declare a variable inside a for loop without turning on C99 mode you might get error. If you do get this error, declare "i" outside for loop. –  Robin Chander Nov 11 '12 at 2:29

You have several problems with your code:

  • As KingsIndian already mentioned, you are missing a * in front of the argv paramter of the main function. This 'Main Function' wiki page contains some more details on this.

  • atoi is used to convert a string number to an integer number. This is not what you want I suppose. argv[x] is already a string (char *), so you can use it directly.

  • If you use it directly, you cannot modify it contents (not allowed, I believe). Therefore you need to make a copy. Use strlen() to find out the length of argv[1], malloc() to create an buffer and strcpy() to copy it:


#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>  
#include <ctype.h>
#include <string.h>

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
  char *word = malloc(strlen(argv[1]) + 1);
  strcpy(word, argv[1]);
  int i;
  for (i = 0; word[i]; i++)
    word[i] = tolower(word[i]);

  printf("Here is the new word: %s\n", word);
  return 0;
}

Additional notes:

  • It would be better (more robust) if you check the amount of given command line parameters using argc!

  • In theory malloc() can return 0, indicating that claiming the memory did fail. So you should check for this.

  • If you only want to print the lower case world, you do not require to first convert it and then print it. Instead, you could directly print each converted character.

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