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1) First Code

class A
{
public:
    int i;
    int b;
    A(int temp){
        i=temp;
        A();
        b=0;
    }

    A(){
        b=0;
    }

    void display(){
        printf("%d %d\n",i,b);//1 0
    }
};

int  main(){
    A Aobj(1);
    Aobj.display();
    return 0;
}

Output: 1 0

2) Second Code

class A
{
public:
    int i;
    int b;
    A(int temp) : i(temp), A(), b(0) {}//Error
    A() : b(0) {}
    void display(){
        printf("%d %d\n",b,i);
    }
};

int  main()
{
    A Aobj(1);
    Aobj.display();
    return 0;
}

I was expecting that both the codes will show same behavior and will produce an error as calling one constructor from the other in the same class is not permitted. It's not C++11.

So why does using the intializer list make a difference? I compiled this codes in g++ 4.3.4 .

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3  
C++11 allows for delegating constructors like in your second example, not calling them inside the body. It sounded like you were expecting an error from the first for that reason, so I wanted to make sure that was clear. –  chris Nov 11 '12 at 2:39
    
second Chris here, you should read about C++ Delegating Constructors. Reference: nullptr.me/2012/01/17/c11-delegating-constructors –  Sarang Nov 11 '12 at 5:21

2 Answers 2

A(); is not doing what you think it does.

Replace it with double(); or char(); or any other type. Note that it works.

All you are doing is creating an anonymous additional instance of the type then throwing it away. It has no impact on this and will not do what you think it does.

The initializer list works in C++11 the way you would expect.

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Please Explain a bit more.What should I replace.and than why it works for the replacement.I know I am breaking the rules but why the rules are not same for both the cases, as both should be erroneous. –  Tapasweni Pathak Nov 11 '12 at 3:00
    
There is exactly one spot in your code that you have the characters A(); right? That is not doing what you think it is doing. It is creating an unrelated temporary of type A then discarding it. –  Yakk Nov 11 '12 at 3:40
    
Why the behavior is not same in both the codes. –  Tapasweni Pathak Nov 11 '12 at 4:03
    
What does this statement do: int();? How about this function: void foo (){ A(); }? How about this function void bar() { A a = A(); }? –  Yakk Nov 11 '12 at 4:15

This has nothing to do with C++11 at all.

As pointed out by Yakk in the first case, you construct an anonymous member non recursively through a different constructor (the default constructor).

In case 'B'; you try to initialize from the initialzier list a member that doesn't exist. You don't have an instance of A or an A* existing within A to initialize.

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