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I am programming a 30-Day-trial application, I need to make sure if the user changes the system time it will not harm my application and the 30-day-trial will still be calculated, or at least I will be able to figure he did something wrong.

The best way I found is to check for a system file which its contents updated and every update contains the time with its data, so I can find out if the user changes the date or not, by comparing the dates with each other ...

I know it is not certain way, but it is kind of make it harder and shrink the area of who can crack it.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I found about Event log

windows7 log files

it can help..

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Any solution proposed can be hacked. But it sounds like you only want to ward off the casual pirate, not the determined hacker.

Instead of trusting the system clock, how about just making a network request back to your own website or time server to get the current date and time?

Another idea is to just limit the number of times the application can be launched instead of limiting it to a specific amount of time.

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The problem is we need to make it offline, since some pirates simply add our app to the blocked application from accessing the network, or simply not using the internet when our app is running, if it is possible we would do that, Thanks :) – Abdallah Nasir Nov 11 '12 at 8:40
    
As I said before, at the end of the day, no matter what you do, a determined hacker can crack your software. But I don't think most casual pirates would think about firewalling the application in addition to rolling back the clock. Did you consider requiring the user to be online for the trial version? That seems like a reasonable compromise. – selbie Nov 12 '12 at 6:40

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