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I'm writing a template for expressions parametrised by an arbitrary number of char labels.

Given an argument list, a factory function returns an expression of different types depending on whether there are two arguments of the same types or whether they are unique.

A concrete example: suppose that A is a "labelable" object with its operator() overloaded to produce an ?Expression<...>. Let a, b, ... be declared as labels LabelName<'a'>, LabelName<'b'>, .... Then A(a,b,c,d) would produce a UniqueExpression<'a','b','c','d'>, whereas A(a,c,b,c) would produce a RepeatedExpression<'a','c','b','c'> instead.

To achieve this, I had to define the ?Expression's factory function with auto and decltype. Moreover, the decltype has to cascade to another decltype until the metaprogram finishes recursing through the arguments and the return type is finally decided. As an illustration, I have isolated a fairly minimal code for the factory method.

template <typename... T> struct TypeList { };
template <char C> struct LabelName { };

template <typename... T> class UniqueExpression
{
    // Contains implementation details in actual code
};

template <typename... T> class RepeatedExpression
{
    // Contains implementation details in actual code
};

class ExpressionFactory {
private:
    template <char _C, typename... T, typename... _T>
    static UniqueExpression<T...>
    _do_build(TypeList<T...>,
              TypeList<LabelName<_C>>,
              TypeList<>,
              TypeList<_T...>)
    {
        return UniqueExpression<T...> ();
    }

    template <char _C, typename... T, typename... _T1, typename... _T2, typename... _T3>
    static RepeatedExpression<T...>
    _do_build(TypeList<T...>,
              TypeList<LabelName<_C>, _T1...>, 
              TypeList<LabelName<_C>, _T2...>,
              TypeList<_T3...>)

    {
        return RepeatedExpression<T...> ();
    }

    template <char _C1, char _C2, typename... T, typename... _T1, typename... _T2, typename... _T3>
    static auto
    _do_build(TypeList<T...>,
              TypeList<LabelName<_C1>, _T1...>, 
              TypeList<LabelName<_C2>, _T2...>,
              TypeList<_T3...>)
    -> decltype(_do_build(TypeList<T...>(),
                          TypeList<LabelName<_C1>, _T1...>(),
                          TypeList<_T2...>(),
                          TypeList<_T3..., LabelName<_C2>>()))
    {
        return _do_build(TypeList<T...>(),
                         TypeList<LabelName<_C1>, _T1...>(),
                         TypeList<_T2...>(),
                         TypeList<_T3..., LabelName<_C2>>());
    }

    template <char _C1, char _C2, typename... T, typename... _T1, typename... _T2>
    static auto
    _do_build(TypeList<T...>,
              TypeList<LabelName<_C1>, LabelName<_C2>, _T1...>, 
              TypeList<>,
              TypeList<LabelName<_C2>, _T2...>)
    -> decltype(_do_build(TypeList<T...>(),
                          TypeList<LabelName<_C2>, _T1...>(),
                          TypeList<_T2...>(),
                          TypeList<>()))
    {
        return _do_build(TypeList<T...>(),
                         TypeList<LabelName<_C2>, _T1...>(),
                         TypeList<_T2...>(),
                         TypeList<>());
    }

public:
    template <char C, typename... T>
    static auto
    build_expression(LabelName<C>, T...)
    -> decltype(_do_build(TypeList<LabelName<C>, T...>(),
                          TypeList<LabelName<C>, T...>(),
                          TypeList<T...>(),
                          TypeList<>()))
    {
        return _do_build(TypeList<LabelName<C>, T...>(),
                         TypeList<LabelName<C>, T...>(),
                         TypeList<T...>(),
                         TypeList<>());
    }
};

The factory could be called in the program like so: (in the actual program there is another class with an overloaded operator() which calls the factory)

int main()
{
    LabelName<'a'> a;
    LabelName<'b'> b;
    ...
    LabelName<'j'> j;

    auto expr = ExpressionFactory::build_expression(a,b,c,d,e,f,g,h,i,j);

    // Perhaps do some cool stuff with expr

    return 0;
}

The above code works as intended, and is correctly compiled by both GCC and the Intel compiler. Now, I understand that the compiler would take more time to perform recursive template deduction as I crank up the number of labels I use.

On my computer, if build_expression is called with one argument, then GCC 4.7.1 takes around 0.26 second to compile on average. The compile time scales up to around 0.29 second for five arguments, and to 0.62 second for ten arguments. This is all perfectly reasonable.

The story is quite different with the Intel compiler. ICPC 13.0.1 compiles the one-argument code in 0.35 second, and the compile time stays pretty much constant for up to four arguments. At five arguments the compile time goes up to 12 seconds, and at six arguments it shoots up above 9600 seconds (that is, over 2 hours and 40 minutes). Needless to say, I haven't waited long enough to find out how long it takes to compile the seven-argument version.


Two questions immediately come to mind:

  • Is the Intel compiler particularly known to be slow to compile recursive decltype?

  • Is there any way to rewrite this code to achieve the same effect in a way that is perhaps friendlier to the compiler?

share|improve this question
    
This is an aside: stackoverflow.com/questions/228783/… do not use symbols starting with an underscore in your code. The std library does, but you should not. –  Yakk Nov 11 '12 at 11:29
    
Is the only thing you care about from do_build the type? If so try returning struct SameType { template<class R> operator R() const { return R(); } }; -- if that compiles it would cut down a lot of copy paste boilerplate and might be an exponential speedup in compilation. –  Yakk Nov 11 '12 at 11:44
    
Post this question on the Intel support forums too, there are a lot of very knowledgeable people thereabouts. –  High Performance Mark Nov 11 '12 at 11:50
    
I'm from Intel Compiler Support team and saw this posting when searching something else. It does sound like a bug in the compiler, please report the problem in the Intel C++ user forum or Intel Premier Support so that the problem can be investigated. Let me know if you need help doing that. Jennifer –  j500 Jan 10 '13 at 20:58
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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here is a stab at it. Instead of doing pairwise comparisons of each of the elements, I sort the list of types, then use a brain-dead unique algorithm to see if there are any duplicates.

I implemented merge sort on types, because it was fun. Probably a naive bubble sort would work better on reasonable number of arguments. Note that a bit of work would allow us to do a merge sort on long lists, and specialize for bubble sorts (or even insertion sorts) on short lists. I'm not up for writing a template quicksort.

This gives me a compile time boolean that says if there are duplicates in the list. I can then use enable_if to pick which overload I'm going to use.

Note that your solution involved n^2 layers of template recursion, at each stage of which the return type requires evaluating the type of a 1 step simpler class, and then the type returned also requires the same! If the Intel compiler memoization fails, you are talking exponential amounts of work.

I augmented a few of your classes with some helpers. I made your LabelNames inherit from std::integral_constant, so I have easy compile time access to their value. This makes the sorting code a tad easier. I also exposed an enum from the repeated and unique return values so I can do simple printf debugging on the result.

Most of this work is writing the merge sort -- is there a standard compile time type sort we could use?

#include <type_traits>
#include <iostream>

template <typename... T> struct TypeList { };

// NOTE THIS CHANGE:
template <char C> struct LabelName:std::integral_constant<char, C> {};

template <typename... T> class UniqueExpression
{
    // Contains implementation details in actual code
public:
  enum { is_unique = true };
};

template <typename... T> class RepeatedExpression
{
    // Contains implementation details in actual code
public:
  enum { is_unique = false };
};

// A compile time merge sort for types
// Split takes a TypeList<>, and sticks the even
// index types into Left and odd into Right
template<typename T>
struct Split;
template<>
struct Split<TypeList<>>
{
  typedef TypeList<> Left;
  typedef TypeList<> Right;
};
template<typename T>
struct Split<TypeList<T>>
{
  typedef TypeList<T> Left;
  typedef TypeList<> Right;
};

// Prepends First into the TypeList List.
template<typename First, typename List>
struct Prepend;
template<typename First, typename... ListContents>
struct Prepend<First,TypeList<ListContents...>>
{
  typedef TypeList<First, ListContents...> type;
};

template<typename First, typename Second, typename... Tail>
struct Split<TypeList<First, Second, Tail...>>
{
  typedef typename Prepend< First, typename Split<TypeList<Tail...>>::Left>::type Left;
  typedef typename Prepend< Second, typename Split<TypeList<Tail...>>::Right>::type Right;
};

// Merges the sorted TypeList<>s Left and Right to the end of TypeList<> MergeList
template< typename Left, typename Right, typename MergedList=TypeList<> >
struct Merge;
template<typename MergedList>
struct Merge< TypeList<>, TypeList<>, MergedList >
{
  typedef MergedList type;
};
template<typename L1, typename... Left, typename... Merged>
struct Merge< TypeList<L1, Left...>, TypeList<>, TypeList<Merged... >>
{
  typedef TypeList<Merged..., L1, Left...> type;
};
template<typename R1, typename... Right, typename... Merged>
struct Merge< TypeList<>, TypeList<R1, Right...>, TypeList<Merged...> >
{
  typedef TypeList<Merged..., R1, Right...> type;
};
template<typename L1, typename... Left, typename R1, typename... Right, typename... Merged>
struct Merge< TypeList<L1, Left...>, TypeList<R1, Right...>, TypeList<Merged...>>
{
  template<bool LeftIsSmaller, typename LeftList, typename RightList, typename MergedList>
  struct MergeHelper;

  template<typename FirstLeft, typename... LeftTail, typename FirstRight, typename... RightTail, typename... MergedElements>
  struct MergeHelper< true, TypeList<FirstLeft, LeftTail...>, TypeList<FirstRight, RightTail...>, TypeList<MergedElements...> >
  {
    typedef typename Merge< TypeList<LeftTail...>, TypeList< FirstRight, RightTail... >, TypeList< MergedElements..., FirstLeft > >::type type;
  };
  template<typename FirstLeft, typename... LeftTail, typename FirstRight, typename... RightTail, typename... MergedElements>
  struct MergeHelper< false, TypeList<FirstLeft, LeftTail...>, TypeList<FirstRight, RightTail...>, TypeList<MergedElements...> >
  {
    typedef typename Merge< TypeList<FirstLeft, LeftTail...>, TypeList<RightTail... >, TypeList< MergedElements..., FirstRight > >::type type;
  };

  typedef typename MergeHelper< (L1::value < R1::value), TypeList<L1, Left...>, TypeList<R1, Right...>, TypeList<Merged...> >::type type;
};

// Takes a TypeList<T...> and sorts it via a merge sort:
template<typename List>
struct MergeSort;
template<>
struct MergeSort<TypeList<>>
{
  typedef TypeList<> type;
};
template<typename T>
struct MergeSort<TypeList<T>>
{
  typedef TypeList<T> type;
};
template<typename First, typename Second, typename... T>
struct MergeSort<TypeList<First, Second, T...>>
{
  typedef Split<TypeList<First, Second, T...>> InitialSplit;
  typedef typename MergeSort< typename InitialSplit::Left >::type Left;
  typedef typename MergeSort< typename InitialSplit::Right >::type Right;
  typedef typename Merge< Left, Right >::type type;
};

// Sorts a TypeList<T..>:
template<typename List>
struct Sort: MergeSort<List> {};

// Checks sorted TypeList<T...> SortedList for adjacent duplicate types
// return value is in value
template<typename SortedList>
struct Unique;

template<> struct Unique< TypeList<> >:std::true_type {};
template<typename T> struct Unique< TypeList<T> >:std::true_type {};

template<typename First, typename Second, typename... Tail>
struct Unique< TypeList< First, Second, Tail... > >
{
  enum
  {
    value = (!std::is_same<First, Second>::value) &&
      Unique< TypeList<Second, Tail...> >::value
  };
};

// value is true iff there is a repeated type in Types...
template<typename... Types>
struct RepeatedType
{
  typedef TypeList<Types...> MyListOfTypes;

  typedef typename Sort< MyListOfTypes >::type MyListOfTypesSorted;
  enum
  {
    value = !Unique< MyListOfTypesSorted >::value
  };
};

// A struct that creates an rvalue trivial constructed type
// of any type requested.
struct ProduceRequestedType
{
  template<typename Result>
  operator Result() { return Result(); };
};

struct ExpressionFactory {
  template<typename... T>
  typename std::enable_if<
    !RepeatedType<T...>::value,
    UniqueExpression<T...>
  >::type
  build_expression(T...) const
  {
    return ProduceRequestedType();
  };
  template<typename... T>
  typename std::enable_if<
    RepeatedType<T...>::value,
    RepeatedExpression<T...>
  >::type
  build_expression(T...) const
  {
    return ProduceRequestedType();
  };
};

// Simple testing code for above:
int main()
{
  auto foo1 = ExpressionFactory().build_expression( LabelName<'a'>(), LabelName<'b'>(), LabelName<'a'>() );
  typedef decltype(foo1) foo1Type;
  if (foo1Type::is_unique)
    std::cout << "foo1 is unique\n";
  else
    std::cout << "foo1 is repeated\n";

  auto foo2 = ExpressionFactory().build_expression( LabelName<'q'>(), LabelName<'a'>(), LabelName<'b'>(), LabelName<'d'>(), LabelName<'t'>(), LabelName<'z'>() );
  typedef decltype(foo2) foo2Type;
  if (foo2Type::is_unique)
    std::cout << "foo2 is unique\n";
  else
    std::cout << "foo2 is repeated\n";
}

In addition I'd like to add a critique of your code: Template programming is programming -- your typenames are the equivalent of using "i1" through "i9" for integer variables in a function. Give your typenames meaningful names when doing something non-trivial.

How does this compile on Intel?

share|improve this answer
    
Apologies for the rather terse code: what I posted was actually a quick rewrite of my program in order to reduce the code size to be posted here. The major difference between that and my sample code is that I actually do require information about the positions of arguments with the same types (and perform tensor contractions, to be delegated to MKL/BLAS whenever possible). Unfortunately, that extra work means that the real code is much longer. I'll have a very good look at your solution and see whether I can modify/augment it to do what I need. Thanks a lot for your effort! –  Saran Nov 11 '12 at 18:29
    
I can confirm that your code compiles in under 0.4 second on Intel, even when I extend it to 10 arguments. –  Saran Nov 11 '12 at 18:43
    
It should not be hard to index the types before sorting and enhance Unique to produce a list of lists of identical indexes. I am guessing that between the n^2 type search and the double evaluation of the type in both return type and return statement is screwing up Intel's template memoizer (assuming it has one). With memoization blocked you have an n^2 depth binary tree of template evaluation -- O(2^n^2)! –  Yakk Nov 11 '12 at 21:25
    
Thank you so much for your solution. In the end I didn't implement a type sort, since I needed to also remove the repeated argument types from the variadic pack, while retaining the order on the rest. I figured that a pointwise compare is no worse than doing insertion sort twice (with a sensible number of indices). Getting rid of decltypes in my old code entailed rewriting everything, but it does mean that the code is much more readable and actually compiles quickly now. There's definitely something wrong with Intel's handling of recursive decltype functions. –  Saran Nov 13 '12 at 0:09
    
Glad to be of help! Writing a template type mergesort was fun. Is that the only thing that your code has to do? Because producing a TypeList< TypePair< TypeList< Index... >, Tag >... >, where the Index... is a sorted list of indexes into the original arguments (with the first instance of the tag first) wouldn't be hard. I'd just have to pass in a sorting template to the Sort<>, gussy up Unique to return TypeList<TypePair<etc>...>, then resort the output by first index. Then bundle up the arguments into a tuple and process as directed by the earlier parsing. Fun! –  Yakk Nov 13 '12 at 3:43
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