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There are many jQuery functions, that can be used with a few callbacks as parameters. For example:

$('#id').draggable({
  create: function( event, ui ) {
    // triggered when the draggable is created
  },
  start: function( event, ui ) {
    // triggered when dragging starts
  }
  ...
});

Can someone explain, how to create such functions properly? And how to do such events as "create" or "start" by oneself? Thanks.

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2 Answers 2

You either use anonymous function (as in example) or pass function stored in object/variable. It depends if you need to use such callback more whan once.

$('#id').draggable({
  create: function( event, ui ) {
    // triggered when the draggable is created
  },
  stop: function (event, ui) {
      controller.stop(event.element);
  }
  start: scope.functionName
  ...
});

As for me I prefer to create interfaces and I'm using anonymous function to delegate execution to correct API call with needed arguments. Little overhead sometimes, but allows to create uniform interfaces without thinking how to implement them in scope in event callback.

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These functions are represented by normal variables.
In plain JavaScript, this looks like this:

function test(aFunction){
    if ( typeof aFunction == "undefined" ) return null;
    if ( typeof aFunction == "function" ) aFunction();
}

test(function(){ alert("Hello!"); });

This will result in an alert showing up "Hello!". In an JSON-Object ({}) you just have to iterate through all the elements inside.

function test(someObject){
    if ( typeof someObject != "object" ) return null;
    for ( var i in someObject )
        if ( someObject.hasOwnProperty(i) && typeof someObject[i] == "function") someObject[i]();
}

test({
    a: function() { alert("Hi!"); },
    b: function() { alert("Hello."); } 
});

This example will result in two alerts, one showing "Hi!", the other showing "Hello.".

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