Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

For reasons that I promise exist, I'm reading input character by character, and if a character meets certain criteria, I'm writing it into a dynamically allocated buffer. This function adds the specified character to the "end" of the specified string. When reading out of the buffer, I read the first 'size' characters.

void append(char c, char *str, int size)
{
 if(size + 1 > strlen(str))
        str = (char*)realloc(str,sizeof(char)*(size + 1));
 str[size] = c;
}

This function, through various iterations of development has produced such errors as "corrupted double-linked list", "double free or corruption". Below is a sample of how append is supposed to be used:

// buffer is a string
// bufSize is the number of non-garbage characters at the beginning of buffer
char *buft = buffer;
int bufLoc=0;
while((buft-buffer)/sizeof(char) < bufSize)
    append(*(buft==),destination,bufLoc++);

It generally works for some seemingly arbitrary number of characters, and then aborts with error. If it's not clear what the second code snippet is doing, it's just copying from the buffer into some destination string. I know there's library methods for this, but I need a bit finer control of what exactly gets copied sometimes.

Thanks in advance for any insight. I'm stumped.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This function does not append a character to a buffer.

void append(char c, char *str, int size)
{
    if(size + 1 > strlen(str))
        str = realloc(str, size + 1);
    str[size] = c;
}

First, what is strlen(str)? You can say "it's the length of str", but that's omitting some very important details. How does it compute the length? Easy -- str must be NUL-terminated, and strlen finds the offset of the first NUL byte in it. If your buffer doesn't have a NUL byte at the end, then you can't use strlen to find its length.

Typically, you will want to keep track of the buffer's length. In order to reduce the number of reallocations, keep track of the buffer size and the amount of data in it separately.

struct buf {
    char *buf;
    size_t buflen;
    size_t bufalloc;
};

void buf_init(struct buf *b)
{
    buf->buf = NULL;
    buf->buflen = 0;
    buf->bufalloc = 0;
}

void buf_append(struct buf *b, int c)
{
    if (buf->buflen >= buf->bufalloc) {
        size_t newalloc = buf->bufalloc ? buf->bufalloc * 2 : 16;
        char *newbuf = realloc(buf->buf, newalloc);
        if (!newbuf)
            abort();
        buf->buf = newbuf;
        buf->bufalloc = newalloc;
    }
    buf->buf[buf->buflen++] = c;
}

Another problem

This code:

str = realloc(str, size + 1);

It only changes the value of str in append -- it doesn't change the value of str in the calling function. Function arguments are local to the function, and changing them doesn't affect anything outside of the function.

Minor quibbles

This is a bit strange:

// Weird
x = (char*)realloc(str,sizeof(char)*(size + 1));

The (char *) cast is not only unnecessary, but it can actually mask an error -- if you forget to include <stdlib.h>, the cast will allow the code to compile anyway. Bummer.

And sizeof(char) is 1, by definition. So don't bother.

// Fixed
x = realloc(str, size + 1);
share|improve this answer

When you do a:

str = (char*)realloc(str,sizeof(char)*(size + 1));

the changes in str will not be reflected in the calling function, in other words the changes are local to the function as the pointer is passed by value. To fix this you can either return the value of str:

char * append(char c, char *str, int size)
{
 if(size + 1 > strlen(str))
        str = (char*)realloc(str,sizeof(char)*(size + 1));
 str[size] = c;

 return str;
}

or you can pass the pointer by address:

void append(char c, char **str, int size)
{
 if(size + 1 > strlen(str))
        *str = (char*)realloc(*str,sizeof(char)*(size + 1));
 (*str)[size] = c;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
There's also a problem with calling strlen. –  Dietrich Epp Nov 11 '12 at 11:35

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.