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Consider this function, which you can think of as a truth table:

public Foo doSomething(bool a, bool b) {

       if ( a &&  b) return doAB();
  else if ( a && !b) return doA();
  else if (!a &&  b) return doB();
  else if (!a && !b) return doNotANotB();

  else throw new Exception("Well done, you defeated boolean logic!");
}

The compiler insists on that last else clause. But from a truth table's perspective, that is an impossible state.

Yes, it works, and yes, I can live with it. But I'm wondering if there is some mechanism in c# to avoid this sort of code, or if I've missed something obvious?

UPDATE:
For bonus points, and purely out of curiosity, are there any languages that deal with this sort of thing differently? Maybe it's not a language matter, but rather one of a smart compiler (but the edge cases would be unimaginably complicated I suppose).

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6  
Yes, there is such mechanism: simply drop the condition of the last if. –  dasblinkenlight Nov 11 '12 at 12:14
    
Very true! Pun intended. But if possible I would like the code to be "readable" or "expressive". Keep in mind this is a simple example. And in 7 months I'l be scratching my head wondering what I was thinking when I wrote it (thus the preferance for expressive code). –  Bobby B Nov 11 '12 at 12:16
    
If the actions are not related to eachother, I would not use the if/else if pattern, but instead go for four separate if blocks followed throwing the exception to satisfy the compiler. In most cases though, there is a 'default' action that fits perfectly in an empty else. –  C.Evenhuis Nov 11 '12 at 12:22
1  
@C.Evenhuis: compiler will want an else after four separate if statements as well... –  Bobby B Nov 11 '12 at 12:27
2  
As far as your second question goes, there is at least one language that deals with this differently: it's C. The compiler simply does not care: the standard says that if you're wrong about your truth table and reaching the end with a return does occur, it's undefined behavior (i.e. a junk value is returned, your program crashes, or both). –  dasblinkenlight Nov 11 '12 at 12:31
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4 Answers 4

up vote 18 down vote accepted

Considering the truth table, the last condition is entirely superfluos. It can be dropped without altering the logic of your program, like this:

public MyType doSomething(bool a, bool b) {

      if ( a &&  b) return doAB();
else  if ( a && !b) return doA();
else  if (!a &&  b) return doB();
else/*if (!a && !b)*/ return doNotANotB();
}

Now you have a final catch-all if, and your compiler is happy. You don't have to remove the condition altogether - I often find it a good idea to keep it around in a comment for readability.

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3  
I actually like leaving the commented-out code because it documents what the condition for last branch effectively is. +1 –  usr Nov 11 '12 at 12:17
    
Yes as I noted in the comment above, this is true. But is there a way where I can express intent without resorting to implicit conditions? Probably not... –  Bobby B Nov 11 '12 at 12:18
    
@BobbyB Absolutely, do not rush! There is a chance that someone who knows C# compiler from the inside sees this question, and shares an insightful answers with us. (I mean specifically Eric Lippert, though unfortunately he has not been answering too many questions lately). –  dasblinkenlight Nov 11 '12 at 12:26
1  
I don't like this because it is easy to get the comment and the behaviour actually different . Say you missed two conditions from the truth table. Your else will catch both of them but your comment only notes a single one. A compiler that can detect exhaustive pattern matching such as f# is better if you have the choice. –  bradgonesurfing Nov 11 '12 at 16:42
    
@bradgonesurfing I definitely agree with you about the compiler being better than humans at processing logical conditions. However, the question says that the three other conditions are exhaustive, so I wrote my answer with this assumption in mind. –  dasblinkenlight Nov 11 '12 at 22:10
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if(a) return b ? doAB() : doA();
else return b ? doB() : doNotAnotB();

Or shorter:

return a ? (b ? doAB() : doA())
         : (b ? doB() : doNotAnotB());
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Try f#. If it can detect exhaustive condition matching with its match directive then it doesn't require an else.

http://ganesansenthilvel.blogspot.co.at/2011/12/f-pattern-matching.html?m=1#!

> let testAND x y =
match x, y with
| true, true -> true
| true, false -> false
| false, true -> false
| false, false -> true

> testAND true false;;
val it: bool = true

and for an incomplete specification

> let testAND x y =
match x, y with
| true, true -> true
// Commented | true, false -> false 
| false, true -> false
| false, false -> true
> testAND true false;;

the compiler will say

Microsoft.Fsharp.Core.MatchFailureExcption: The match cases were incomplete at:....
Stopped due to error
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 public MyType doSomething(bool a, bool b)
        {
            switch(a)
            {
                case true:
                    if (b) return doAB();
                    return doA();
                default:
                    if (b) return doB();
                    return doNotANotB();

            }

        }

Update:

Note that your original statement is actually:

  public MyType doSomething(bool a, bool b)
        {
            if (a && b) return doAB();
            if (a) return doA();
            if (b) return doB();
            return doNotANotB();
        }

For fun and succintnes (if not readability :p):

static MyType doSomething(bool a, bool b)
        {
            return a && b ? doAB() : a ? doA() : b ? doB() : doNotANotB();
        }
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Obviously less readable, but very cool indeed! –  Bobby B Nov 11 '12 at 12:39
    
I think I prefer the latter example. I don't think it is less readable as long as proper variable and method names are used, and perhaps some newlines and indentation. –  Sahuagin Nov 11 '12 at 13:19
    
Nods, I like the latter myself although I think it's easy to trip up on the nested ternary evaluations. –  Anthill Nov 11 '12 at 13:27
1  
I needed to read that ternary a few times till I understood what went where. I prefer the second example which effectively reduces the original boolean states, so it makes it easier to understand. –  Bobby B Nov 11 '12 at 13:31
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