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I am trying to loop a char*str use this to find out how many lines:

char *str = "test1\ntest2\ntest3";

int lines = 0;

for(int i = 0 ; i < ?? ; i ++ )
{
    if(str[i] == '\n') {
        lines++;
    }
}

I am not sure what to put at the ??, the question is :

1.I mean do I need to use strlen(str) + 1 ?

2.when the str is "test1\ntest2\ntest3\n",does the code still calculate correct lines?

I am using gcc by the way,thanks

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6 Answers 6

up vote 7 down vote accepted

every literal string ends with \0 which is a null character..It depicts the end of the string

So, You can do this

for(int i = 0 ; str[i]!='\0' ; i ++ )
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Not only literal string constants (why the code formatting there anyway?) but in fact everything C can treat as a “string”. –  Joey Nov 11 '12 at 13:31
    
@Joey corrected it.. –  Anirudha Nov 11 '12 at 13:45

To extend the already-existent good answers: the idiomatic way for looping through a C string is

const char *s = "abc\ndef\nghi\n";
int lines = 0;
int nonempty = 0;
while (*s) {
    nonempty = 1;
    if (*s++ == '\n') lines++;
}

If you don't want to count the last empty line as a separate line, then add

if (nonempty && s[-1] == '\n' && lines > 0) lines--;

after the while loop.

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1  
I think the condition at the end should be if (lines && s[-1] == '\n'); otherwise unpredictable for the empty string. –  Arkku Nov 11 '12 at 13:33
    
@Arkku Fixed, thanks. –  user529758 Nov 11 '12 at 14:18
    
It's still indexing outside of the original string in case it was the empty string. –  Arkku Nov 11 '12 at 17:37
    
@Arkku not anymore (depends on lazy evaluation, before you spot that str[-1] is still accessed). –  user529758 Nov 11 '12 at 19:20
    
Any particular reason to introduce the additional variable nonempty rather than simply checking for lines > 0 (which implies nonempty) before s[-1]? As for s[-1] still being accessed, are you referring to some compiler-specific behaviour where optimizations might cause it to be accessed if it is guaranteed to not be a problem? –  Arkku Nov 11 '12 at 20:10

Take the length of the string and iterate through all characters.

const unsigned long length=strlen(str);
for(int i = 0 ; i < length ; i ++ )
{
     if(str[i] == '\n') {
       lines++;
   }
}
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2  
loops over the string twice. The str[i] resp. str[i] != '\0' solution is better. –  glglgl Nov 11 '12 at 13:23
    
I agree, it's faster. –  Ramy Al Zuhouri Nov 11 '12 at 13:27

The following will deliver the same result regardless if the last character is a newline or not.

char *abc = "test1\ntest2\ntest3";

int lines = 0;

{
    bool lastWasNewline = true;
    char * p = abc;
    for (; *p; ++p) {
        if (lastWasNewline) ++lines;
        lastWasNewline = *p == '\n';
    }
}
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Have you compiled this? Declaring two variables of different type in a for statement is new to me. And then this test for strlen as loop condition is really, really not the the way to do it. –  Jens Gustedt Nov 11 '12 at 13:26
    
Of course you're right. I've corrected it. –  JohnB Nov 11 '12 at 13:30

1.I mean do I need to use strlen(str) + 1 ?

no, just use str[i] for i < ??, this tests if that is the 0 character which terminates the string

2.when the abc is "test1\ntest2\ntest3\n",does the code still calculate correct lines?

no, you code assumes that the input is broken into one input line per buffer line[j].

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Don't use str[i] for ??, but use str[i] instead of i < ??. –  glglgl Nov 11 '12 at 13:20
    
@glglgl, right, corrected. Thanks! –  Jens Gustedt Nov 11 '12 at 13:21

in place of ?? put strlen(abc) and make sure #include <string.h>

For better efficiency do

int length= strlen(abc);

and then use i < length

Or use str[i]!= '\0'

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6  
That's not efficient: at every iteration it will calculate again strlen. –  Ramy Al Zuhouri Nov 11 '12 at 13:18
1  
But it's also a way –  Omkant Nov 11 '12 at 13:19
2  
@H2CO3 It's still terrible advice to suggest something like this to beginners when the correct solution is no more complex. –  Arkku Nov 11 '12 at 13:24
2  
@Arkku What if I tell you most decent compilers will optimize that out amyway? –  user529758 Nov 11 '12 at 13:26
2  
@H2CO3 Umm, "the compiler will optimize it" is a considerably worse excuse to teach bad practices than "it doesn't matter in this case"; the compiler's optimization cannot, in the general case, be relied upon, it's not visible in the code, and it causes problems with different compilers & different optimization flags, etc. –  Arkku Nov 11 '12 at 13:31

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