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I am parsing documents which contain large amounts of formatted numbers, an example being:

 Frc consts  --     1.4362                 1.4362                 5.4100
 IR Inten    --     0.0000                 0.0000                 0.0000
 Atom AN      X      Y      Z        X      Y      Z        X      Y      Z
    1   6     0.00   0.00   0.00     0.00   0.00   0.00     0.00   0.00   0.00
    2   1     0.40  -0.20   0.23    -0.30  -0.18   0.36     0.06   0.42   0.26

These are separated lines all with a significant leading space and there may or may not be significant trailing whitespace). They consist of 72,72, 78, 78, and 78 characters. I can deduce the boundaries between fields. These are describable (using fortran format (nx = nspaces, an = n alphanum, in = integer in n columns, fm.n = float of m characters with n places after the decimal point) by:

 (1x,a14,1x,f10.4,13x,f10.4,13x,f10.4)
 (1x,a14,1x,f10.4,13x,f10.4,13x,f10.4)
 (1x,a4,a4,3(2x,3a7))
 (1x,2i4,3(2x,3f7.2))
 (1x,2i4,3(2x,3f7.2))

I have potentially several thousand different formats (which I can autogenerate or farm out) and am describing them by regular expressions describing the components. Thus if regf10_4 represents a regex for any string satisfying the f10.4 constraint I can create a regex of the form:

COMMENTS 
      (\s
      .{14}
      \s
      regf10_4,
      \s{13}
      regf10_4,
      \s{13}
      regf10_4,
)

I would like to know whether there are regexes that satisfy re-use in this way. There is a wide variety in the way computers and humans create numbers that are compatible with, say f10.4. I believe the following are all legal input and/or output for fortran (I do not require suffixes of the form f or d as in 12.4f) [the formatting in SO should be read as no leading spaces for the first, one for the second, etc.]

-1234.5678
 1234.5678
            // missing number
 12345678.
 1.
 1.0000000
    1.0000
        1.
 0.
        0.
     .1234
    -.1234
    1E2
    1.E2
    1.E02
  -1.0E-02
**********  // number over/underflow

They have to be robust against the content of the neighbouring fields (e.g. only examine precisely 10 characters in a precise position. Thus the following are legal for (a1,f5.2,a1):

a-1.23b   // -1.23
- 1.23.   // 1.23
3 1.23-   // 1.23

I am using Java so need regex constructs compatible with Java 1.6 (e.g. not perl extensions)

share|improve this question
1  
+1 for trying to be as complete as possible but I fear by being this complete, you might have obscured what you are really after. I for one could construct a regex to get the number out of your provided examples but with all the fortran stuff, I doubt it would be what you want. What if you would just throw us a bunch of strings and what you'd expect as a result? – Lieven Keersmaekers Aug 26 '09 at 8:54
    
Thanks. I want to (a) test the line as containing the components I want and (b) extract the fields which I then parse using Java e.g. parseDouble(group(i).trim()) and catch exceptions. The asterisks are dealt with as a special case – peter.murray.rust Aug 26 '09 at 11:08
    
Will you have a format spec like (1x,a4,a4,3(2x,3a7)) for each line in advance? Or do you have to deduce that as part of the parsing task? – Alan Moore Aug 26 '09 at 20:40
    
I have all the formats required but do not know when they change from one to another (I have a framework for managing that). [I am also working on deducing the formats but I am using different methods for that such as dynamic programming]. Although in principle I could extract the fields and try tp parse them there are other fields (with more text) where regexes are the simplest way to do it – peter.murray.rust Aug 26 '09 at 21:13
up vote 2 down vote accepted

As I understand it, each line comprises one or more fixed-width fields, which may contain labels, spaces, or data of different kinds. If you know the widths and types of the fields, extracting their data is a simple matter of substring(), trim() and (optionally) Whatever.parseWhatever(). Regexes can't make that job any easier--in fact, all they can do is make it a lot harder.

Scanner doesn't really help, either. True, it has predefined regexes for various value types, and it does the conversions for you, but it still needs to be told which type to look for each time, and it needs the fields to be separated by a delimiter it can recognize. Fixed-width data doesn't require delimiters, by definition. You might be able to fake the delimiters by doing a lookahead for however many characters should be left in the line, but that's just another way of making the job harder than it needs to be.

It sounds like performance is going to be a major concern; even if you could make a regex solution work, it would probably be too slow. Not because regexes are inherently slow, but because of the contortions you would have to go through to make them fit the problem. I suggest you forget about regexes for this job.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Given the answering own question below, I believe this set the OP on the right track. – Lieven Keersmaekers Aug 27 '09 at 6:40
    
Thank you. I agree that this is probably the best approach for the problem as stated. Unfortunately the more general problem is that there are some outputs which use whitespace separation instead of formatting and I was looking for a general solution. [Did you have ideas on the automatic extraction of formatting from a corpus of documents from the same source?] – peter.murray.rust Aug 27 '09 at 10:10
    
I'd be looking for a flat-file parsing library if I were you, although there don't seem to be many of those out there (for Java, anyway). But if you have to create your solution from scratch, don't base it on regexes. As for the automatic extraction of formatting... maybe in Perl. :-/ – Alan Moore Aug 27 '09 at 10:53

You could start with this and go from there.

This regex matches all the numbers you've provided.
Unfortunatly, it also matches the 3 in 3 1.23-

// [-+]?(?:[0-9]+(?:\.[0-9]*)?|\.[0-9]+)(?:[eE][-+]?[0-9]+)?
// 
// Match a single character present in the list “-+” «[-+]?»
//    Between zero and one times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed (greedy) «?»
// Match the regular expression below «(?:[0-9]+(?:\.[0-9]*)?|\.[0-9]+)»
//    Match either the regular expression below (attempting the next alternative only if this one fails) «[0-9]+(?:\.[0-9]*)?»
//       Match a single character in the range between “0” and “9” «[0-9]+»
//          Between one and unlimited times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed (greedy) «+»
//       Match the regular expression below «(?:\.[0-9]*)?»
//          Between zero and one times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed (greedy) «?»
//          Match the character “.” literally «\.»
//          Match a single character in the range between “0” and “9” «[0-9]*»
//             Between zero and unlimited times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed (greedy) «*»
//    Or match regular expression number 2 below (the entire group fails if this one fails to match) «\.[0-9]+»
//       Match the character “.” literally «\.»
//       Match a single character in the range between “0” and “9” «[0-9]+»
//          Between one and unlimited times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed (greedy) «+»
// Match the regular expression below «(?:[eE][-+]?[0-9]+)?»
//    Between zero and one times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed (greedy) «?»
//    Match a single character present in the list “eE” «[eE]»
//    Match a single character present in the list “-+” «[-+]?»
//       Between zero and one times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed (greedy) «?»
//    Match a single character in the range between “0” and “9” «[0-9]+»
//       Between one and unlimited times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed (greedy) «+»
Pattern regex = Pattern.compile("[-+]?(?:[0-9]+(?:\\.[0-9]*)?|\\.[0-9]+)(?:[eE][-+]?[0-9]+)?");
Matcher matcher = regex.matcher(document);
while (matcher.find()) {
	// matched text: matcher.group()
	// match start: matcher.start()
	// match end: matcher.end()
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you - this is useful annotation of regex constructs. Unfortunately SO has truncated some of your code – peter.murray.rust Aug 26 '09 at 17:12

It is only a partial answer but I was alerted to Scanner in Java 1.5 which can scan text and interpret numbers which gives a BNF for the numbers that can be scanned and interpreted by this Java utility. In principle I imagine the BNF could be used to construct a regex.

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