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The reflection classes and methods as well as class loaders etc. need the so called "binary" names of classes to work with.

The question is, how does one get the binary name if one only has the fully qualified name, i.e. the name that one would use in source code.

For example:

package frege;
public static class RT {
    ....
    public static class X { .... }
}

The fully qualified name of the class would be frege.RT.X. Yet, to get the class object, one needs to write:

Class.forName("frege.RT$X")

and not

Class.forName("frege.RT.X")    // fails with ClassNotFoundException

because X happens to be an inner class of frege.RT.

A possible, but clumsy, solution would be to replace . with $ from backwards, one by one, until Class.forName() doesn't throw ClassNotFoundException anymore or there are no more . to replace.

Is there any better/well known/standard solution? I looked in the API docs for Class, CLassLoader and java.lang.reflect but did not find anything usable.

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2  
I am not sure about the forName method needing the so-called "binary name". The documentation says it uses the fully qualified name. –  Edwin Dalorzo Nov 11 '12 at 14:23
    
@EdwinDalorzo You can trust me on that. It doesn't find inner classes with simple names. (At least not with JDK 1.7.0) –  Ingo Nov 11 '12 at 14:28
    
That's interesting. I am not in my computer now, but I will give it a try as soon as I can. It is weird because the difinition of Fully Qualified Name in the JLS does not incorporate the notion of the "binary name". Inner classes are simply denoted with a period (.) just as all others. And the Javadocs says that the method should receive a fqn. So this case is interesting. –  Edwin Dalorzo Nov 11 '12 at 14:34
    
@EdwinDalorzo You are right, the API doc is apparently broken here. It actually says: Given the fully qualified name for a class or interface (in the same format returned by getName) and there it says: If this class object represents a reference type that is not an array type then the binary name of the class is returned, as specified by The Java™ Language Specification. –  Ingo Nov 11 '12 at 14:40
    
Well, it appears that Class.getName() returns the binary name. This is quite an interesting question. I have not found a way to convert your canonical name to a binary name. I will fave this one because I hope somebody comes up with an answer eventually. –  Edwin Dalorzo Nov 11 '12 at 15:19
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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

It now sounds like you want to get the fully qualified name (FQN) from the canonical name. As that is different from working from a simple name I'll add a second answer.

The Sun javac command will not compile a classes if a canonical name conflict would result. However by compiling separately you can still get two different classes with the same canonical name.

An example:

File src1\com\stack\Test.java

package com.stack;

public class Test {
    public static class Example {
        public static class Cow {
            public static class Hoof {
            }
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        Class<?> cl1 = Class.forName("com.stack.Test$Example$Cow$Hoof");
        Class<?> cl2 = Class.forName("com.stack.Test.Example.Cow.Hoof");
        System.out.println(cl1.getName());
        System.out.println(cl1.getSimpleName());
        System.out.println(cl1.getCanonicalName());
        System.out.println();
        System.out.println(cl2.getName());
        System.out.println(cl2.getSimpleName());
        System.out.println(cl2.getCanonicalName());
    }
}

File src2\com\stack\Test\Example\Cow\Hoof.java

package com.stack.Test.Example.Cow;

public class Hoof { }

Then to compile and execute:

set CLASSPATH=
mkdir bin1 bin2
javac -d bin1 -sourcepath src1 src1\com\stack\Test.java
javac -d bin2 -sourcepath src2 src2\com\stack\Test\Example\Cow\Hoof.java

set CLASSPATH=bin1;bin2
java com.stack.Test

Producing the output:

com.stack.Test$Example$Cow$Hoof
Hoof
com.stack.Test.Example.Cow.Hoof

com.stack.Test.Example.Cow.Hoof
Hoof
com.stack.Test.Example.Cow.Hoof

Thus two classes have the same canonical name but different FQNs. Even if two classes have the same FQN and same canonical name, they can still be different if they are loaded via different class loaders.

To resolve your issue I see several ways forward you could take.

First you can specify that you match the class with the least amount of nesting and hence the least number of '$'s in the FQN. UPDATE It turns out Sun javac does the exact opposite of this and matches the class with the most nesting.

Second you can test all possible FQNs and throw an exception if there is more than one.

Third, accept that the only unique mapping is with the FQN then only within a specified class loader and re-work you application appropriately. I find it convenient to use the thread context class loader as a default class loader.

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Thank you for the deep-going discussion. Alas, what happens if fou feed a 3rd program to javac, with new com.stack.Test.Example.Cow.Hoof() in it (and both of the above in your classpath?). Which one will javac choose? –  Ingo Nov 12 '12 at 16:49
    
With both on the classpath, my Sun javac always uses com.stack.Test$Example$Cow$Hoof regardless of which appears on the classpath first. –  Simon G. Nov 12 '12 at 19:15
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A simple name omits a lot of information and it is possible to have many classes with the same simple name. That may make this impossible. For example:

package stack;

/**
 * 
 * @author Simon Greatrix
 */
public class TestLocal {

    public Object getObject1() {
        class Thing {
            public String toString() { 
                return "I am a Thing";
            }
        }
        return new Thing();
    }

    public Object getObject2() {
        class Thing {
            public String toString() { 
                return "I am another Thing";
            }
        }
        return new Thing();
    }

    public Object getObject3() {
        class Thing {
            public String toString() { 
                return "I am a rather different Thing";
            }
        }
        return new Thing();
    }

    /**
     * @param args
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        TestLocal test = new TestLocal();
        Object[] objects = new Object[] {
                test.getObject1(),                
                test.getObject2(),                
                test.getObject3()                
        };

        for(Object o : objects) {
            System.out.println("Object      : "+o);
            System.out.println("Simple Name : "+o.getClass().getSimpleName());
            System.out.println("Name        : "+o.getClass().getName());
        }
    }
}

This produces the output:

Object      : I am a Thing
Simple Name : Thing
Name        : stack.TestLocal$1Thing
Object      : I am another Thing
Simple Name : Thing
Name        : stack.TestLocal$2Thing
Object      : I am a rather different Thing
Simple Name : Thing
Name        : stack.TestLocal$3Thing

As you can see, all three local classes have the same simple name.

share|improve this answer
    
Right. But this is not my concern. (I updated the question to avoid confusion rgd. "simple" and "fuly qualified" name.) In fact, I am only talking about public classes nested in other classes, hence ones that can be named in a java program with a name like x.y.Z. Or, to put the question differently: When one writes foo.bar.Baz.X, how does the java compiler know whether this is a nested class or not? –  Ingo Nov 11 '12 at 20:54
1  
Not to mention, you could have a top-level class MyStuff containing an Example inner class, and a package named MyStuff and containing a top-level class Example, and the simple name MyStuff.Example alone could not distinguish between the two. –  cHao Nov 11 '12 at 20:55
    
@cHao You're right, but this is also a border case where classes can be in the "unnamed" package. We can assume I am only interested in classes that are in a named package. –  Ingo Nov 12 '12 at 9:55
    
It turns out that such a case does not compile. The compiler reports an error when a package and a class have the same name. –  Simon G. Nov 12 '12 at 10:56
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