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I'm currently trying to write a program which will read words from a text file. Finally I plan to read certain words from a file and so on but at the moment I can't get my current code to work.

I have 3 files. Header file, main file and implementation file.

ReadWords.h

#ifndef READWORDS_H
#define READWORDS_H
/**
* ReadWords class. Provides mechanisms to read a text file, and return
* capitalized words from that file.
*/
using namespace std;

#include <string>
#include <fstream>

 class ReadWords
 {
   public:
    /**
     * Constructor. Opens the file with the default name "text.txt".
     * Program exits with an error message if the file does not exist.
     */
     ReadWords();

    /**
     * Constructor. Opens the file with the given filename.
     * Program exits with an error message if the file does not exist.
     * @param filename - a C string naming the file to read.
     */
     ReadWords(char *filename);

    /**
     * Closes the file.
     */
     void close();


   // working storage.
   private:
     string nextword;
     ifstream wordfile;
     bool eoffound;

 };

 #endif

ReadWords.cpp

#include "ReadWords.h"
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

//:: Defines function as member of class.


ReadWords::ReadWords(char *filename)
{
    ifstream str;
    str.open("hamlet.txt");
    char c;
    while ((c = str.get()) !=EOF){
        cout << c << endl;
    }
}

void close()
{

}

main.cpp

#include "ReadWords.h"

int main()
{
    ReadWords rw;
    rw.ReadWords("hamlet.txt");
}

Now I know I'm clearly doing something wrong, but I'm not 100% sure what. The error I receive in compilation is as follows:

main.cpp: In function `int main()':
main.cpp:6: error: invalid use of `class ReadWords'

Tool completed with exit code 1

Any help is greatly appreciated. :)

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closed as too localized by Mat, Tim Post Nov 12 '12 at 6:19

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always look at the first error you get - "#include expects "FILENAME" or <FILENAME>" and examine that line. If you googled you would have got several hints about what you were doing wrong... –  Caribou Nov 11 '12 at 17:35
    
Which resource are you using to learn C++? –  learner Nov 11 '12 at 17:55
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6 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In your main.cpp, you missed the quotes in the #include ReadWords.h directive. To fix this you should use #include "ReadWords.h".

Also, you should note that std::istream::get returns only a character. If you want to read a whole word in a (for example) std::string, you should use std::istream::operator >> like this:

std::ifstream in("my_file");
std::string word;

if (in.is_open()) {
    while (in >> word) {
        //do something with word
    }
}

Another thing that stands out is that in rw.ReadWords("hamlet.txt") you're calling a constructor as if it were a member function. The proper way to use that overload is: ReadWords rw("hamlet.txt").

As a side note: the constructor's job is to initialize the object. It's not a good practice to do more than that inside it's body.

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To fix the very first error from the compiler, the first line of main.cpp

#include ReadWords.h

needs to be:

#include "ReadWords.h"
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Thank you so much, no idea how I didn't notice this. –  James Warner Nov 11 '12 at 17:40
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It should be

#include "ReadWords.h"

or

#include <ReadWords.h>
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2  
I would avoid the second form for user-made headers. –  Waleed Khan Nov 11 '12 at 17:36
    
There may be some cases where you can use it - c-faq.com/cpp/incl.970605.html –  user93353 Nov 11 '12 at 17:44
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First off, you need to add a ";" after rw.ReadWords("hamlet.txt") in main.cpp. That is the meaning of the last line of your compiler output.

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1  
first off he needs to re-read the textbook.... or basic tutorial –  Caribou Nov 11 '12 at 17:37
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This seems needlessly complicated. Won't this do?

vector<string> words;
string word;
while(cin >> word)
    words.push_back(word);
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1  
Won't work if you start with #include vector :-) –  user93353 Nov 11 '12 at 17:50
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There are numerous mistakes in your programming:

  1. close the file that you have opened. Always remember this, it may cause run-time errors.
  2. in the main.cpp file it is #include "ReadWords.h" in the first line
  3. Put a semi-colon at the end of the code line: rw.ReadWords("hamlet.txt");
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ifstream's destructor will close the file. It will not cause any runtime errors. –  user93353 Nov 11 '12 at 17:51
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