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My question is a bit long. I am learning abstract factory pattern.

I have a abstract class for the abstract factory. I want to share the "resources" needed by the concrete factories. So I simply make the variable inside AbstractFactory as static

public class AbstractFactory{
    private static Vector vector = new Vector();

    protected Vector void getVector() {
        return vector;
    }

    protected void setVector(Vector v){
        this.vector = v;
    }

    public abstract Circle createCircle();
}

And its Subclass will look like:

public class ConcreteFactory extends AbstractFactory{
    public ConcreteFactory(){
        super();
    }

    public Circle createCircle(){
        Circle circle = new Circle();
        getVector().add(circle);
        return circle;
    }
}

However, my teacher said that I should not use the static object instance because static variables are often used for some constants.

Therefore, I use instance variable instance instead of static variable for the Vector , and I pass the vector from outside when I instantiate the concrete factory.

So the new design of my classes will look like:

public class AbstractFactory{
    private Vector vector;

    protected Vector void getVector() {
        return vector;
    }

    protected void setVector(Vector v){
        this.vector = v;
    }

    public abstract Circle createCircle();
}

public class ConcreteFactory extends AbstractFactory{
    public ConcreteFactory(Vector v){
        super();
        setVector(v);
    }

    public Circle createCircle(){
        Circle circle = new Circle();
        getVector().add(circle);
        return circle;
    }
}

**

My question is : why I should not use the static variable to share object?

**

It will be easier to share resources among the concrete factories without passing in the Vector when I create an instance of concrete factories.

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2  
And what may be the purpose of your vector? I must also say that any curriculum that even mentions Vector is highly suspect. This class has been obsolete for more than a decade. –  Marko Topolnik Nov 11 '12 at 18:05
    
Is the Vector perhaps a cache? It doesn't make a lot of sense to share objects between distinct factory implementations. Especially since the point of an abstract factory in practice is for a client of the library to be able to provide his own factory implementation. –  Marko Topolnik Nov 11 '12 at 18:08
    
In the original version of the code, the products created from concrete factories all require the Vector in the their constructor, which means the products need the same vector, and the factories should have the same vector so that they can enable to make the products with the same vector. Are there any better designs to solve this problem? –  code4j Nov 11 '12 at 19:01
    
Every design choice is subject to the analysis of the complete picture. Without knowing the precise role of the vector it is impossible to say what is better design. If the vector is practically a global variable, then it would make sense to have it in a static var. However, I can't see a realistic scenario where the global variable would have to be accessible from all those prouduct objects. Normally it would be hidden behind an API that would provide a service which needs that variable internally. –  Marko Topolnik Nov 11 '12 at 19:13
    
It is a definite issue with your proposal that you use an instance method to return the value of the static var. If classes need access to that shared resource, then either use a public static final Vector, or a a private static final Vector with a public static Vector getVector(). Your way still makes sense if a subclass may override this and provide a different vector, but there would have to be a reason for that design. –  Marko Topolnik Nov 11 '12 at 19:19
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Sometimes what makes your life easier today will make it much, much more difficult down the road.

Some examples: You don't always know the environment where your class will be used. Maybe different instances of your factories will wind up being loaded by different class loaders (this happens often in web applications). You could wind up with completely unpredictable behavior using a static instance variable that way. Static variables are almost always a bad idea.

That said, I think that what you really want to do in your class is this:

public class AbstractFactory{
    private final Vector vector;

    protected AbstractFactory(Vector vector){
        this.vector = vector;
    }

    protected Vector void getVector() {
        return vector;
    }

    public abstract Circle createCircle();
}

and

public class ConcreteFactory extends AbstractFactory{
    // USE THIS IF YOU NEED TO SHARE THE VECTOR AMONGST MULTIPLE FACTORY INSTANCES
    public ConcreteFactory(Vector vector){
        super(vector);
    }
    // OR USE THIS IF THE VECTOR IS SPECIFIC TO THE FACTORY
    public ConcreteFactory(){
        super(new Vector());
    }    

    public Circle createCircle(){
        Circle circle = new Circle();
        getVector().add(circle);
        return circle;
    }
}

the use of final on the instance variable is a good idea for this sort of thing - it keeps you from accidentally changing the variable elsewhere in your code. But that is optional. The key change that I made is adding vector to the constructor of the abstract base class, then passing it in from the super class.

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I think I get your point. The use of static variable to share object just like sharing the vector for multiple instances of factories behind the screen. Since the sharing of vector is done behind the screen, when other people or myself to review the code later, it will be difficult to know those factories are using the same vector. And it may cause unpredictable behavior because we don't know they are using the same vector. For example, instance A createCircle(), it influences instance B, we will be difficult to find out the reason why they influence others by looking at programing code. –  code4j Nov 11 '12 at 19:38
    
Yes - you've got it. If the intent is to truly have a single instance of Vector used in every place throughout your application, then you are looking for a Singleton, and there are much better ways of implementing Singleton than using a static variable (per Effective Java enum is a good way of doing this). But Singleton is something best to avoid unless you really know what you are doing (there are times when it is appropriate - but most of the obvious ones are better handled in other ways). As you continue to learn, remember: "encapsulation". –  Kevin Day Nov 11 '12 at 23:05
    
PS - your question was very well asked. Most students have problems asking questions that make me want to answer - your attitude towards the learning process (seeking to understand, not just asking for an answer) is refreshing - and will take you far. Keep it up! –  Kevin Day Nov 11 '12 at 23:07
    
Thanks for your encouragement :) In fact, I always doubt that my approach to learning is slow and inefficient. I always appreciate some of my classmates who can have the technical skills easily just by learning with some examples and online tutorial. Rather than learning by online examples, and tutorials, I would more like to read a book because I can get more comprehensive understanding on the topic. However, I still always doubt the fact that reading a book is really better or not. By the way, I will also remember "encapsulation". Just as a matter of interest, are you a teacher :)? –  code4j Nov 12 '12 at 20:39
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static attributes are just not meant to be used that way.
statics are something, that is available only once during runtime.
In your case that means that all factories deriving from your AbstractFactory will share this single vector.

See this example:

ConcreteFactory a = new ConcreteFactory();
ConcreteFactory b = new ConcreteFactory();
a.createCircle();
b.createCircle();

Both objects a and b will now have two entries in the vector, since they share the same, static vector.

Also do I think, that

protected void setVector(Vector v){
    this.vector = v;
}

is illegal, because vector is not an attribute of the instance of the Factory, but an attribute of the Factory itself!

Adding to that it is just a bad, error prone (try debugging that on a larger scale) and plain ugly style of coding.

Just trust your teacher there - he's right ;)

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So static is not used to share resources, it is used to indicates somethings that are only once at the run time, such as constants and the methods always giving the same output? In addition, What do you mean of bad, ugly style of coding?? Do you mean that the method should be static in order to access the static variable ? –  code4j Nov 11 '12 at 19:08
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The fact that static final variables are sometimes used as constants should not prevent you from using the same mechanism wherever it servers the best (logger is the only other example I can give).

It is always good though, when there is no implicit component coupling to the outer world. If you define vector as a static variable you leave user no possibility to make your factories be context based and independent from one other. If you make the vector an argument of the factory then it is up to the factory creator (typically Spring context loader nowdays) to define which factories share the vector and which do not.

Another reason to pass vector as an argument in your case is related to the unit testing aspect. If your class is designed to take vector from the outside you can mock it and test your class more thoroughly.

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+1 the factories can be context based and independent from each other will passed in vector. +1 unit test can be more thoroughly because I can easily control the state of everythings, no matter factories or vector. I hope I can 'tick' all the answers as the best answer. But I have ticked another one,I really thanks for your explanation :) –  code4j Nov 11 '12 at 19:46
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