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I have the following component based architecture. How can I break out of the Manager's loop which is updating the Components, from within the Update function of a specific Component?

Component

class Component
{
    virtual void Update() = 0;
};

Manager

class Manager
{
    vector<Component*> List;
    void Add(Component* cpnt)
    {
        List.push_back(cpnt);
    }
    void Loop()
    {
        while(1)
        {
            for (auto i = List.begin(); i != List.end(); i++)
                i->Update();
        }
    }
};

Example

class Example : public Component
{
    void Update()
    {
        // want to break out of mgr's while loop from here
    }
};

int main()
{
    Manager mgr;
    mgr.Add(new Example());
    mrg.Loop();
}

(Please note that I ignored accesors in this example for simplicity.)

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1  
+1 for including only the relevant part of the code :) –  Alex Nov 11 '12 at 18:24

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can either throw an exception from Update and catch it outside the loop or break from the loop depending on the return value of Update.

Which one you choose depends on the logic. If breaking out of the loop is a result of a logical error, use an exception.

If it's part of the logic, use a return.

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+1 I wish more people would follow the usage pattern in the last two sentences. –  WhozCraig Nov 11 '12 at 18:13
1  
Thanks, it is part of the logic that the manager ends sometime. –  danijar Nov 11 '12 at 18:14

You can make Update return value, based upon which you may wish not to continue the loop.

You can also use exceptions.

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Make Update() return a code indicating whether to stop or not, and check for that in the Manager loop. Or throw an exception, which would be more C++-like, and if breaking out is not something that happens too often.

That is, either change virtual void Update() into virtual bool Update() or similar, with the following Manager loop:

bool ok = true;
while(ok)
    for (auto i = List.begin(); i != List.end() && ok; i++)
        ok = i->Update();

Or make Update() throw an exception:

void Update()
{
    do stuff;
    if(bad) throw SomeException();
}

and wrap the Manager loop in a try/catch clause.

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Could you explain throwing an exception, please? –  danijar Nov 11 '12 at 18:10
    
If you know nothing about C++ exceptions, you can read about them here –  amaurea Nov 11 '12 at 18:13
    
Do NOT use exceptions for flow control. –  Alex Nov 11 '12 at 18:20

If you can change Update, make it return a bool telling the manager whether it should break.

    while(1)
    {
        for (auto i = List.begin(); i != List.end(); i++)
            if( !i->Update() )
                 goto end_loop;
    }
    end_loop:

I've used goto to exit the outer loop, you can use a variable to make a double break if you're afraid of goto.

You can (and should) use return instead if there is nothing more to execute in the Loop.

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1  
Haters gonna hate. –  Alex Nov 11 '12 at 18:11
    
There is much more than executing the loop inside the update functions. Basically all of the component's logic is placed there. –  danijar Nov 11 '12 at 18:12
1  
@sharethis I was talking about Manager::Loop after the while. If there is some code after the closing bracket of while, you need to break to it. Otherwise you can just return; –  Alex Nov 11 '12 at 18:15
    
Alright, Alex. :) –  danijar Nov 11 '12 at 18:17

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