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I have polygon in raster with "signed int" 2D coordinates. Polygon has its vertices ordered in clockwise direction.

I want to store this polygon in some more "space friendly" way, that just store the sequence of int x, y coordinates. If I compress this file with rar, I got sizes about 3.5x smaller than uncompressed. Is there any better representation than simply storing x,y in a sequence?

The compression should be lossless.

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is the polygon convex? or can it also be non-convex? –  kutschkem Apr 3 '13 at 18:06
    
@kutschkem It is not neccessarily convex, but it is a simple polygon : it does not self intersect. –  AlexWien Apr 3 '13 at 19:03

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted
+50

If your polygon is (x1, y1), (x2, y2) ... (xn, yn), you can write it as,

x1, x2-x1, x3-x2, xn-xn-1, y1, y2-y1 ..., yn-yn-1

Typically the differences between adjacent x,y values will be smaller than the absolute values, so you can store the deltas as variable length ints. By doing this, each x,y pair can typically be stored in 2 or 4 bytes rather than 8.

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I have implemented it this way two years ago, but without using var ints, I used short when possible, int otherwise. There is yet a better solution where variable ints are not only limited to whole bytes like in Google protobuf (thanks for your link): I read an article where they can use ints with 12bit, 13 bits, etc. to fit perfectly the needed size of the polygon deltaX,y. An java source for this type of compression would be interesting –  AlexWien Mar 29 '13 at 14:09
1  
Which idiot downvoted this very good answer? Up to now it is the only correct one. –  AlexWien Mar 29 '13 at 15:36
    
Which advantage you see in your prosed oder x1,dx2,dx3,..dxn, y1,dy2,dy2,dyn as oposed to order: x1,y1,dx2,dy2,dx3,dy3,..,dxn,dyn –  AlexWien Apr 2 '13 at 17:25
    
they are probably equivalent –  sbridges Apr 2 '13 at 18:15
    
For special applications there could be a slight advantage to your propsoed order, when e.g only the x coordinates are needed, e.g by a x-plane-sweep search. that would need half the memory passed to such a method. –  AlexWien Apr 2 '13 at 18:19

It's hard to provide a definite answer as the result depends on a lot of factors. I did a fast test with GZIPOutputStream to compress individual polygons and the results depend much on the number of points of the polygon, but also on its area.

Basically I created polygons with an increasing number of vertices randomly distributed in a predefined area. Then I sorted the vertices clockwise and compressed the differences with GZIP

For polygons that fit into a standard screen (1440x900):

D Npoints: 3 Uncompressed: 24 Compressed: 41 Ratio: 0.58536583
D Npoints: 4 Uncompressed: 32 Compressed: 49 Ratio: 0.6530612
D Npoints: 5 Uncompressed: 40 Compressed: 58 Ratio: 0.6896552
D Npoints: 6 Uncompressed: 48 Compressed: 61 Ratio: 0.78688526
D Npoints: 7 Uncompressed: 56 Compressed: 66 Ratio: 0.8484849
D Npoints: 8 Uncompressed: 64 Compressed: 72 Ratio: 0.8888889
D Npoints: 9 Uncompressed: 72 Compressed: 80 Ratio: 0.9
D Npoints: 10 Uncompressed: 80 Compressed: 84 Ratio: 0.95238096
D Npoints: 11 Uncompressed: 88 Compressed: 89 Ratio: 0.98876405
D Npoints: 12 Uncompressed: 96 Compressed: 94 Ratio: 1.0212766
D Npoints: 13 Uncompressed: 104 Compressed: 96 Ratio: 1.0833334
D Npoints: 14 Uncompressed: 112 Compressed: 102 Ratio: 1.0980393
D Npoints: 15 Uncompressed: 120 Compressed: 108 Ratio: 1.1111112
. . .
D Npoints: 99 Uncompressed: 792 Compressed: 457 Ratio: 1.7330415

The compression ratio decreases for larger areas (1440*4x900*4):

D Npoints: 3 Uncompressed: 24 Compressed: 45 Ratio: 0.53333336
D Npoints: 4 Uncompressed: 32 Compressed: 55 Ratio: 0.58181816
D Npoints: 5 Uncompressed: 40 Compressed: 60 Ratio: 0.6666667
D Npoints: 6 Uncompressed: 48 Compressed: 67 Ratio: 0.7164179
D Npoints: 7 Uncompressed: 56 Compressed: 70 Ratio: 0.8
D Npoints: 8 Uncompressed: 64 Compressed: 79 Ratio: 0.8101266
D Npoints: 9 Uncompressed: 72 Compressed: 87 Ratio: 0.82758623
D Npoints: 10 Uncompressed: 80 Compressed: 93 Ratio: 0.86021507
D Npoints: 11 Uncompressed: 88 Compressed: 102 Ratio: 0.8627451
D Npoints: 12 Uncompressed: 96 Compressed: 109 Ratio: 0.88073397
D Npoints: 13 Uncompressed: 104 Compressed: 113 Ratio: 0.920354
D Npoints: 14 Uncompressed: 112 Compressed: 119 Ratio: 0.9411765
D Npoints: 15 Uncompressed: 120 Compressed: 125 Ratio: 0.96
D Npoints: 16 Uncompressed: 128 Compressed: 135 Ratio: 0.94814813
D Npoints: 17 Uncompressed: 136 Compressed: 137 Ratio: 0.99270076
D Npoints: 18 Uncompressed: 144 Compressed: 137 Ratio: 1.0510949
D Npoints: 19 Uncompressed: 152 Compressed: 148 Ratio: 1.027027
D Npoints: 20 Uncompressed: 160 Compressed: 148 Ratio: 1.081081
D Npoints: 21 Uncompressed: 168 Compressed: 154 Ratio: 1.0909091
D Npoints: 22 Uncompressed: 176 Compressed: 160 Ratio: 1.1
    . . . 
D Npoints: 99 Uncompressed: 792 Compressed: 520 Ratio: 1.5230769

I'm not sure how you can get sizes that are 3.5 smaller but I assume that you compressed a bunch of polygons together. Compressing multiple polygons together would obviously increase the compression ratio.

Of course this is not a usable approach for a program, as it would have to keep decompressing the polygons to draw them into the screen which would require more memory, and CPU beating the whole purpose. I just wanted to get some figures...

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there are systems which zip a part of a road map (polygons) like navigation systems, when this part is not used. –  AlexWien Mar 29 '13 at 23:32
    
@AlexWien Hadn't thought about that case. It makes sense in that situation since you're not repeatedly drawing the polygons. I don't know why, but I assumed the original intention was to have a small memory footprint for on-screen polygons... –  Jorge Cardoso Mar 30 '13 at 10:24

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