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I'm trying to create a file hierarchy to store data. I want to create a folder for each data acquisition session. That folder has five subfolders, which are named below. My code attempt below gives an error, but I'm not sure how to correct it.

Code

 #!/bin/sh
 TRACES = "/Traces"
 LFPS = '/LFPS'
 ANALYSIS = '/Analysis' 
 NOTES = '/Notes'
 SPIKES = '/Spikes'

 folders=($TRACES $LFPS $ANALYSIS $NOTES $SPIKES)
 for folder in "${folders[@]}"
  do
    mkdir $folder
  done

Error I get an error when declaring the variables. As written above, bash flips the error Command not found. If, instead, I declare the file names as TRACES = $('\Traces'), bash flips the error No such file or directory.

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3  
Error is because of spaces (see answers below). You don't need a loop: Just mkdir "${folders[@]}" is fine. Use more quotes. I don't get the point of defining all these variables anyway. Be careful, these folders will be created in the root of the file system, which is a very bad idea. –  gniourf_gniourf Nov 11 '12 at 18:43
    
@gniourf_gniourf: I intended to modify the path. I just shortened it for the purposes of the question. I'm defining the variables because I'm doing PhD research and my supervisor wants folders named a certain way. (sigh) –  mac389 Nov 11 '12 at 19:17
    
To answer your question "Why do I get an error", it's because of the whitespaces in the assignments which should read as TRACES="/Traces". Apart from this, you code should work. Please use mkdir "$folder" (with the double quotes ") in your loop, just in case you have spaces in your paths (and if you claim you don't have spaces, just put the quotes anyway, it's the best habit you can get when programming bash). Also, please write folders=("$TRACES" "$LFPS" "$ANALYSIS" "$NOTES" "$SPIKES") with quotes! –  gniourf_gniourf Nov 11 '12 at 20:15

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Remove the spaces between the variable names and the values:

#!/bin/sh
TRACES="/Traces"
LFPS='/LFPS'
ANALYSIS='/Analysis' 
NOTES='/Notes'
SPIKES='/Spikes'

folders=($TRACES $LFPS $ANALYSIS $NOTES $SPIKES)
for folder in "${folders[@]}"
 do
   mkdir $folder
 done

With spaces, bash interprets this like

COMMAND param1 param2

with = as param1

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Also you would want to do some checking beforehand if folders exist or not. Also you can always debug the shell script with set -x, you could just use "mkdir -p" which would do the trick.

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I'm taking the 'no spaces around the variable assignments' part of the fix as given.

Using array notation seems like overkill. Allowing for possible spaces in names, you can use:

for dir in "$TRACE" "$LFPS" "$NOTES" "$PASS"
do mkdir "$dir"
done

But even that is wasteful:

mkdir "$TRACE" "$LFPS" "$NOTES" "$PASS"

If you're worried that the directories might exist, you can avoid error messages for that with:

mkdir -p "$TRACE" "$LFPS" "$NOTES" "$PASS"

The -p option is also valuable if the paths are longer and some of the intermediate directories might be missing. If you're sure there won't be spaces in the names, the double quotes become optional (but they're safe and cheap, so you might as well use them).

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1  
This is a smart solution, I didn't even realize you could pass multiple parameters to mkdir. –  brianbaligad Oct 19 '13 at 16:51

I made the following changes to get your script to run.

As a review comment it is unusual to create such folders hanging off the root file system.

#!/bin/sh
TRACES="/Traces"
LFPS='/LFPS'
ANALYSIS='/Analysis'
NOTES='/Notes'
SPIKES='/Spikes'

folders="$TRACES $LFPS $ANALYSIS $NOTES $SPIKES"
for folder in $folders
do
   mkdir $folder
done

Spaces were removed from the initial variable assignments and I also simplified the for loop so that it iterated over the words in the folders string.

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2  
Would be better to loop over the elements of the array, if you only left the array (now how can we deal with potential spaces in file names?). Besides, a loop is useless, mkdir $folders is plenty enough. –  gniourf_gniourf Nov 11 '12 at 18:44
    
I agree. That was a quick hack. I rarely consider spaces in directory file names in a Unix/Unix-like OS setting because like Rocky Balboa and condominiums, I never use them ;-) youtube.com/watch?v=eSGweaROZBQ –  Rob Kielty Nov 11 '12 at 18:46
1  
+1 for "Do not create folders like that in the root directory". –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 19 '13 at 16:57

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