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I'm trying to write a program that will calculate the number of Friday the 13ths in a given year if the user inputs a year, month, day of the week and date in Java. I know I need to use arrays but I'm not sure how. There is a friday the 13th in a month is the first day of the month is a sunday. I'm a java beginner so please don't give me the super indepth way to do it, but the simplest and easiest to understand one. The part i'm stuck at is moving from month to month. Let's say we are given March 1st. and it's a thursday. There clearly isn't a firday the 13th in this month, but how can I move to April and May and so on until December, incrementing the date, day of week, and month, for each month to check if the first day is a sunday. Thanks for the help!

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closed as not a real question by Bart Kiers, A.H., Ken White, Jim Garrison, kleopatra Nov 12 '12 at 12:07

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
learn about JodaTime library joda-time.sourceforge.net, this will not solve but simplify implementation –  Marek Sebera Nov 11 '12 at 20:35
7  
Why don't you post your code; specifically the part you're stuck on. That will make it easier for us to know where to start helping you. –  Paul Richter Nov 11 '12 at 20:38

3 Answers 3

  1. Get the calender object with day as 13th and month as 1 for the given year.

        int year = 2012; //user input
        String dateString = "01/13/"+year;
        DateFormat dateFormat = new SimpleDateFormat("MM/dd/yyyy");
        Date date = dateFormat.parse(dateString);
        Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance();
        cal.setTime(date);
    
  2. Count if it's Friday by adding one month at a time in a loop.

        int counter = 0;
        int months = 0;
        while(months++ <= 12){
           if(Calendar.FRIDAY == cal.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_WEEK)){
              counter++;
           }
           cal.add(Calendar.MONTH, 1);
        }
    
      System.out.println("Number of Fridays on 13th = "+ counter);      
    
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I will not give you a direct answer, you should figure most of it out after reading this though! I would check this out : http://www.java-examples.com/display-day-week-using-java-calendar Then you have a way to set the dates to strings.. And then you should make loops checking each month for day1=sunday.

I hope this help. Give it some testing and playing around with code and loops, then come back and ask again :)

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Like Marek Sebera suggested, JodaTime is very easy to use and learn. The following code will print all the 13th Fridays in a year starting from a given date:

DateTimeFormatter dateParser = DateTimeFormat.forPattern("yyyy-MM-dd");        
DateTime date = dateParser.parseDateTime("2001-03-10");                        
DateTime initDate = date;                                                      
date = date.withDayOfMonth(13); //reset to the 13 of the current month          
if (date.compareTo(initDate) == -1) //add a month if the start date was after 13 
    date=date.plusMonths(1);                                                   
while (date.getYear() == initDate.getYear()) {                                 
    date = date.plusMonths(1);                                                 
    if (date.getDayOfWeek() == DateTimeConstants.FRIDAY)                       
        System.out.println("date = " + date);                                  
}                                                                              
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