Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I getting a Conversion Error when try delete or edit a user from a table in my application. The value is being passed in the metadata from the listUser.xhmtl to the deleteUser.xhtml page. The value is being passed in the metadata but for some reason upon calling the delete action I get the Conversion Error setting value "someemail@somedomain.com" for 'null Converter'. The user id is a String.

This is the url after requesting the userDelete.xhmtl:

http://localhost:8080/lavpWebApp/user/deleteUser.xhtml?user=someemail%40somedomain.com

This is the userList.xhmtl simplified:

<h:column>
                            <f:facet name="header">Edit</f:facet>
                            <h:link outcome="/user/editUser.xhtml" value="Edit User">
                                <f:param name="user" value="#{item.email}"/>
                            </h:link>                            
                        </h:column>

                        <h:column>
                            <f:facet name="header">Delete</f:facet>
                            <h:link outcome="/user/deleteUser.xhtml" value="Delete User">
                                <f:param name="user" value="#{item.email}"/>
                            </h:link>
                        </h:column>

This is userDelete.xhtml simplified:

<f:metadata>
        <f:viewParam name="user" value="#{userController.user}" converter="#{userConverter}"/>
    </f:metadata>

    <h:body>
        Do you want to delete #{userController.user.name}?
        <h:form>
            <h:commandButton action="#{userController.deleteUser()}"
                             value="Delete"/>
            <h:commandButton action="#{userController.doCancelDeleteUser()}"
                             value ="Cancel"/>
        </h:form>
    </h:body>

This is the Converter class:

@ManagedBean
@FacesConverter(value="userConverter")
public class UserConverter implements Converter{

    @EJB
    private UserSellerEJB userEjb;

    @Override
    public Object getAsObject(FacesContext context, UIComponent component, String value) {
        if (value == null || value.isEmpty())
        {
            return null;
        }
        if(!value.matches("\\d+"))
        {
            throw new ConverterException("The value is not a valid email: " + value);
        }

        String id = value.toString();
        return userEjb.findUserById(id);

    }

    @Override
    public String getAsString(FacesContext context, UIComponent component, Object value) {
        if(value == null)
        {
            return null;
        }

        if(!(value instanceof UserSeller))
        {
            throw new ConverterException("The value is not a User: " + value);            
        }

        String id = ((UserSeller) value).getEmail();
        return (id != null) ? id.toString() : null;
    }

}

This is the userController class simplified:

@Named
@RequestScoped
public class UserController{

    @EJB
    private UserSellerEJB userEJB;

    private UserSeller user = new UserSeller(); 
    private List<UserSeller> usersList = new ArrayList<UserSeller>();

    // ------------------------------------------------------------- Constructor
    public UserController() {
    }

    // -------------------------------------------------------- Business Methods

    public String doCreateUser()
    {
        user = userEJB.createSeller(user);
        usersList = userEJB.findAllSellers();
        return "listUser?faces-redirect=true";        
    }

        // update user

        public void PreRenderView()
        {
            if(user == null)
            {
                user = new UserSeller();
            }            
        }

        public String doUpdateUser()
        {
            if(user.getEmail() != null)
            {
                userEJB.updateSeller(user);
            }
            else
            {
                userEJB.createSeller(user);
            }

            return "listUser?faces-redirect=true";
        }

    public String deleteUser()
    {
        userEJB.deleteSeller(user);
        return "listUser?faces-redirect=true";
    }

    public String doCancelDeleteUser()
    {
        return "listUser?faces-redirect=true";
    }


    @PostConstruct
    public void init()
    {
        usersList = userEJB.findAllSellers();       
    }
share|improve this question
    
try assigning a name to the @ManagedBean annotation and using that instead to access the converter. Make sure it's different from the one you're already using in the @FacesConverter –  kolossus Nov 11 '12 at 21:31
    
A @ManagedBean can't have the @FacesConverter annotation. Remove the @ManagedBean annotation ant the code will work. By the way, you're mixing JSF with CDI, it will be better to study both and their differences. Related: Inject a EJB into a JSF converter with JEE6. –  Luiggi Mendoza Nov 12 '12 at 0:59
    
@kolossus thanks. I have added the name to the @ManagedBean, I used @ManagedBean(name="userSellerConverter") but still it's giving the same error. –  lv10 Nov 12 '12 at 1:04
    
@LuiggiMendoza, that's not accurate. A converter can also be annotated with @ManagedBean. I know because I've done it several times. It's the only way the converter can have access to @Inject type resources –  kolossus Nov 12 '12 at 1:07
1  
Technically, Luiggi is right that a @ManagedBean cannot have a @FacesConverter annotation. It's usually the one or the other, not both. –  BalusC Nov 12 '12 at 11:46

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The null converter in the exception message indicates that the converter instance cannot be found. Since you're referencing the converter as a managed bean by converter="#{userConverter}, it would only be found if it's annotated with @javax.faces.bean.ManagedBean and if the class is located in the WAR (and thus not in the EJB/EAR or elsewhere!).

The @FacesConverter annotation isn't been used in this construct and in fact superfluous — and only confusing to starters. Remove that annotation. The @EJB works indeed only in managed beans.

If really in vain (I could however not explain why), try managing it by CDI instead: replace the JSF @ManagedBean annotation by the CDI @Named annotation. You're apparently already successfully managing front controller beans by CDI.


Unrelated to the concrete problem, the converter seems to be designed to convert based on a technical ID (a DB primary key), not an email address. An email address can never match \d+ (which is regex for "digits only"). Make sure that you're not confusing email address with ID.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you very much for your detailed suggestions. I have followed your instructions, I removed the @FacesConverter annotation, I have also replaced the @ManagedBean annotation for @Named("userConverter"). I have also removed the regex condition. I'm using the email as an id for this User that is why I used email. Problem is now fixed. Thank you very much. –  lv10 Nov 13 '12 at 2:05
    
BalusC - onie question: I am new to JSF and have read that @FacesConverter is required and would like to fully understand why I needed to remove it in this case. Could you extend a little bit your explanation on why we removed it for this converter? - Thanks in advance. –  lv10 Nov 13 '12 at 2:09
1  
That's because you want to inject an @EJB in it. The @FacesConverter (and @FacesValidator) is however not a supported injection target. This oversight is fixed in upcoming JSF 2.2. –  BalusC Nov 13 '12 at 10:52
    
Thank you very much, I got it now. –  lv10 Nov 13 '12 at 16:27

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.