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I have recently bought a book on OpenGL, and I can't seem to get it working.

For example, it gives me the error:

ld.exe||cannot find -lGL|.

My compiler is GNU-GCC MinGW on with the IDE Code::Blocks, and my OS is Windows 7 64 bit. I have linked the libraries: opengl32, glu32, glut32, and in other linker options I have: -lmingw32 -lSDLmain -lSDL, because this was advised on the code::blocks wiki.

I have some experience with C++, but not at all when it comes to linking, and setting up the compiler, because this used to go quite automatic.

How do I fix this error?

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Can you rephrase this in terms of a question? What exactly are you trying to do with OpenGL? How are you invoking it? The more descriptive information is, the easier it will be for people to help you. –  Blaskovicz Nov 11 '12 at 21:59

3 Answers 3

It's probably due to the library and include folder permission set to read-only, I am currently having the same issues but i am working with my SFML compilation, I solved it by setting the linker to the exact lib file not the folder, you may try the same solution

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-lGL is the linkage option used on *nix systems. On Windows you should use -lopengl32

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So what should I change? If I put -lopengl32 in my linker settings that doesn't change anything. I don't really have a clue what to do. As I stated before, when it comes to setting up my compiler I don't really know that much. –  user1816721 Nov 12 '12 at 8:27
    
@user1816721: Well, omit the -lGL, because that's nonexistend on a Windows system; however it may be, that one of the library includes errorneous adds a linking #pragma pulling in libGL.so (-lGL). –  datenwolf Nov 12 '12 at 10:32

The flag -lGL is to link to the opengl library, but on Windows the opengl library is called opengl32, not libgl. So you shouldn't use -lGL and if you're already linking in opengl32 then that should be all you need.

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It seems I need to do something. I can't seem to find where I am using lGL, I have this in my file: #ifdef _WIN32 #include <windows.h> #endif #include <iostream> #include <vector> #include <string> #include <SDL/SDL.h> #include <GL/gl.h> #include <GL/glu.h> but removing the statement #inlcude <GL/gl.h> doesn't solve anything, nor does it remove or add an error. –  user1816721 Nov 12 '12 at 8:29
    
It shouldn't have anything to do with includes. You do need to include GL/gl.h, anyway. Since presumably you already checked the linker flags I'm not sure where else you would check since I'm not familiar with your build system. Look around and try to get more verbose output is all I can say. –  bames53 Nov 12 '12 at 9:05

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