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I am trying to figure out the formula to get the distance between two objects in 3d space. So far, the answers are wrong when I run the program:

float Distance3D(const float & object1X , 
             const float & object1Y ,
             const float & object1Z , 
             const float & object2X , 
             const float & object2Y ,
             const float & object2Z )
{
    float x = pow ((object2X - object1X),2);// for x
    float y = pow ((object2Y - object1Y),2);// for y
    float z = pow ((object2Z - object1Z),2);// for z
    float objectDistance = 0.0f;

    objectDistance = sqrt(object2X*object1X + object2Y*object1Y + object2Z*object1Z);
    cout << objectDistance << endl;

    return objectDistance;
}
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3  
You start correctly, but then abandon it completely. Why did you calculate x, y and z if you never use them in the later code? You correctly calculated x, y and z. Now continue to work with x, y and z to get the distance. –  AndreyT Nov 11 '12 at 23:13
    
I would like to voice my disapproval of your math teachers. –  Mikhail Nov 11 '12 at 23:32

5 Answers 5

If you want the Euclidean distance between 2 points in 3D space your code should look more like

objectDistance = sqrt((object2X-object1X)*(object2X-object1X) + 
                      (object2Y-object1Y)*(object2Y-object1Y) + 
                      (object2Z-object1Z)*(object2Z-object1Z));

or more simply using your squared distance variables x,y,z :

objectDistance = sqrt(x + y + z);
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The x, y and z are already squared. You don't need to square them again. –  AndreyT Nov 11 '12 at 23:17
    
@AndreyT Thanks for pointing that out. I only added them after the question was edited –  mathematician1975 Nov 11 '12 at 23:19

Unless you are interested strictly in distance of two points in a 3-D space, Gilbert-Johnson-Keerthi distance algorithm is what you might be interested in.

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Distance in 3D space is usually found using the Pythagorean Theorem.

The formula for this is

d^2=(x0-x1)^2+(y0-y1)^2+(z0-z1)^2

where d is the distance between the points.

Using this formula, your code should look like

float Distance3D(const float & object1X , 
             const float & object1Y ,
             const float & object1Z , 
             const float & object2X , 
             const float & object2Y ,
             const float & object2Z )
{
    float delta_x = pow (object2X - object1X,2);// for x
    float delta_y = pow (object2Y - object1Y,2);// for y
    float delta_z = pow (object2Z - object1Z,2);// for z
    float objectDistance = 0.0f;

    objectDistance = sqrt(delta_x*delta_x + delta_y*delta_y + delta_z*delta_z);
    cout << objectDistance << endl;

    return objectDistance;
}

Interestingly, for high-dimensional data the usefulness of this metric declines and the Manhatten distance can become a preferable metric. A paper entitled "On the Surprising Behavior of Distance Metrics in High Dimensional Space" by Aggarwal (2001) has been wrote about this.

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Your formula is incorrect; take a look at the 2D distance formula, then extend it to 3D.

Also note the similarities to the formula for getting 2D/3D vector length.

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You should try the square root of the square of the difference of each component. See formula

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