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I'm using Python 2.6.2. I have a list of tuples pair which I like to sort using two nested conditions.

  1. The tuples are first sorted in descending count order of fwd_count,
  2. If the value of count is the same for more than one tuple in fwd_count, only those tuples having equal count need to be sorted in descending order based on values in rvs_count.
  3. The order does not matter and the positioning can be ignored, if a) tuples have the same count in fwd_count and also in rvs_count, or a) tuples have the same count in fwd_count and does not exist in rvs_count

I managed to write the following code:

pair=[((0, 12), (0, 36)), ((1, 12), (0, 36)), ((2, 12), (1, 36)), ((3, 12), (1, 36)), ((1, 36), (4, 12)), ((0, 36), (5, 12)), ((1, 36), (6, 12))]

fwd_count = {}
rvs_count = {}

for link in sorted(pair):  
    fwd_count[link[0]] = 0
    rvs_count[link[1]] = 0

for link in sorted(pair):  
    fwd_count[link[0]] += 1
    rvs_count[link[1]] += 1

#fwd_count {(6, 12): 1, (5, 12): 1, (4, 12): 1, (1, 36): 2, (0, 36): 2}
#rvs_count {(3, 12): 1, (1, 12): 1, (1, 36): 2, (0, 12): 1, (2, 12): 1, (0, 36): 1}

fwd_count_sort=sorted(fwd_count.items(), key=lambda x: x[1], reverse=True)
rvs_count_sort=sorted(rvs_count.items(), key=lambda x: x[1])

#fwd_count_sort [((1, 36), 2), ((0, 36), 2), ((6, 12), 1), ((5, 12), 1), ((4, 12), 1)]
#rvs_count_sort [((3, 12), 1), ((1, 12), 1), ((1, 36), 2), ((0, 12), 1), ((2, 12), 1), ((0, 36), 1)]

The result I am looking for is:

#fwd_count_sort_final [((0, 36), 2), ((1, 36), 2), ((6, 12), 1), ((5, 12), 1), ((4, 12), 1)]

Where the position of (1, 36) and (0, 36) have swapped position from the one in fwd_count_sort.

Question:

  1. Is there a better way to do multi condition sorting using fwd_count and rvs_count information at the same time? (Only the tuples are important, the sort value need not be recorded.), or
  2. Would I need to sort it individually for each conditions (as I did above) and try to find mean to integrate it to get the result I wanted?

I am currently working on item #2 above, but trying to learn if there are any simpler method.

This is the closest I can get to what I am looking for "Bidirectional Sorting with Numeric Values" at http://stygianvision.net/updates/python-sort-list-object-dictionary-multiple-key/ but not sure I can use that if I create a new dictionary with {tuple: {fwd_count : rvs_count}} relationship.

Update: 12 November 2012 -- SOLVED

I have managed to solve this by using list. The below are the codes, hope it is useful for those whom are working to sort multi condition list.

#pair=[((0, 12), (0, 36)), ((1, 12), (1, 36)), ((2, 12), (0, 36)), ((3, 12), (1, 36)), ((1, 36), (4, 12)), ((0, 36), (5, 12)), ((1, 36), (6, 12))]

rvs_count = {}
fwd_count = {}

for link in sorted(pair):
  rvs_count[link[0]] = 0
  fwd_count[link[1]] = 0

for link in sorted(pair):
  rvs_count[link[0]] += 1
  fwd_count[link[1]] += 1

keys = []
for link in pair:
    if link[0] not in keys:
        keys.append(link[0])
    if link[1] not in keys:
        keys.append(link[1])

aggregated = []
for k in keys:
    a = -1
    d = -1
    if k in fwd_count.keys():
        a = fwd_count[k]
    if k in rvs_count.keys():
        d = rvs_count[k]
    aggregated.append(tuple((k, tuple((a,d)) )))

def compare(x,y):
    a1 = x[1][0]
    d1 = x[1][1]
    a2 = y[1][0]
    d2 = y[1][1]
    if a1 > a2:
        return  - a1 + a2
    elif a1 == a2:
        if d1 > d2:
            return d1 - d2
        elif d1 == d2:
            return 0
        else:
            return d1 - d2
    else:
        return - a1 + a2

s = sorted(aggregated, cmp=compare)
print(s)

j = [v[0] for v in s]
print(j)

Thanks to Andre Fernandes, Brian and Duke for giving your comments on my work

share|improve this question
    
Could you explain why you want ((6, 12), 1) sorted before ((5, 12), 1) in the result? – wim Nov 11 '12 at 23:38
    
@wim I missed to mention those who has same count in "fwd_count" and also in "rvs_count" (if exist) the order does not matter. Since fwd_count is sorted in descending order, whenever the count is same, python list then sort it descending based on "link" id, since ((6, 12), 1) > ((5, 12), 1), the tuple ((6, 12), 1) is sorted before ((5, 12), 1). But it does not matter in my case. Hope I have clarified well. Thanks for asking. – Saravanan K Nov 11 '12 at 23:47
1  
I do not understand the pattern? Why is everything being switched? – enginefree Nov 11 '12 at 23:49
    
@enginefree Sir, I do not get you equally. Are you asking the purpose of code? Kindly clarify, I will try to explain it. – Saravanan K Nov 11 '12 at 23:54
    
your question is very unclear. why does (1, 36) and (0, 36) need to be swapped and not the pair (6, 12) and (5, 12)? – Duke Nov 12 '12 at 0:41
up vote 0 down vote accepted

If you require to swap all first (of pair) elements (and not just (1, 36) and (0, 36)), you can do fwd_count_sort=sorted(rvs_count.items(), key=lambda x: (x[0][1],-x[0][0]), reverse=True)

share|improve this answer

I'm not exactly sure on the definition of your sorting criteria, but this is a method to sort the pair list according to the values in fwd_count and rvs_count. Hopefully you can use this to get to the result you want.

def keyFromPair(pair):
    """Return a tuple (f, r) to be used for sorting the pairs by frequency."""
    global fwd_count
    global rvs_count

    first, second = pair
    countFirstInv = -fwd_count[first] # use the negative to reverse the sort order
    countSecond   = rvs_count[second]

    return (first, second)

pairs_sorted = sorted(pair, key = keyFromPair)

The basic idea is to use Python's in-built tuple ordering mechanism to sort on multiple keys, and to invert one of the values in the tuple so make it a reverse-order sort.

share|improve this answer
    
still doesn't address my question. – Duke Nov 12 '12 at 0:48

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