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I'm trying to center a div on the document, and it works horizontally, but not vertically:

width: 950px;
height: 630px;
background: #FFFFFF;
margin: auto;

Shouldn't margin: auto place it in the center of whatever it's in (the page itself, in this case)? I used to have a workaround for this, but I can't get it to work. It would also be nice to know what I'm doing wrong, so I can stop doing it.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

margin: auto does not align elements vertically.

If you have to support older browsers, you'll have to define a fixed height for your div:

div {
    position: relative;
    top: 50%;
    width: 750px;
    height: 500px; /* sample. adjust as needed */
    margin: -250px auto 0; /* half the height */
}

Here's the fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/2qmVX/


If you don't care about IE8 and below, this'll allow you to retain your fluid height:

div {
    position: relative;
    top: 50%;
    margin: auto;
    transform: translateY(-50%);
    /* add prefixed versions... */
}

Here's the fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/VMaVM/ (remember: modern browsers only).


Update: As pointed out by @FabrícioMatté, you also have to apply 100% height to the html & body elements:

html, body {
    height: 100%;
}

See the demos above.

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2  
Don't forget to add that if you don't give 100% width and height to the html and body elements this will most likely not work. –  Fabrício Matté Nov 12 '12 at 1:48
    
+1 for the translateY, wasn't aware that it could be used for this. In a layman's terms, it's a more modern way of giving a negative margin without having to set a fixed value? I'll find some use for it on the next responsive design I make. –  Fabrício Matté Nov 12 '12 at 1:53
    
@FabrícioMatté - The html & body elements are block level elements, and are automatically rendered with width: 100%. As for their height: you're most definitely right, and I have them set up that way in the fiddles. Added a note to the answer above. Thanks. –  Joseph Silber Nov 12 '12 at 1:55
    
Thanks for the heads up as well, one less line from my CSS normalization code by removing the width:100% =] –  Fabrício Matté Nov 12 '12 at 1:59
    
There's still one issue with both approaches, that is, if the window height is lower than the div's height, the div will be pushed up outside of the viewport and it is not possible to scroll up to see the first line. Guess that can't be easily solved. –  Fabrício Matté Nov 12 '12 at 2:10

Proper vertical centering is something that not even CSS3 covers yet.

Luckily in your case, as you have a fixed height, you can maneuver the top/left properties and use negative margin-top and margin-left to attain the desired behavior, with absolute positioning:

background: #FFFFFF;
width: 950px;
height: 630px;
top: 50%;
left: 50%;
margin: -315px 0 0 -425px; /*top is negative half of height, same for width*/
position: absolute;

Demo / source

Beware that negative margins may behave unexpectedly on resolutions smaller than the div.


Here's a slightly more hackish way, using a table. The basic idea is that the vertical-align:middle CSS property when applied to a table has the same effect as the old valign="center" attribute. So the HTML would looks like this:

<table class="vcenter"><tr><td>
    <div id="myDiv">This is a centered div</div>
</td></tr></table>

And the CSS:

.vcenter {
    vertical-align: middle;
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
}
#myDiv {
    background: #FFF;
    width: 950px;
    height: 630px;
    margin: 0 auto;
}
html, body { height: 100%; }

Demo / source

Advantages of this method is that it is completely cross-browser - tested on IE6 and up, Firefox, Chrome, Opera and Safari. I didn't test on mobile browsers though it should work. Also it doesn't have the scrolling issue with small resolutions. I use this hack for centered modals in one of my production sites.

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