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So, a long story short, I have a Java homework assignment that requires a long ArrayList of Strings to be manipulated in various ways (we're doing things like showing combinations of words, adding and removing from the ArrayList, nothing too special). I noticed that a few of the provided ArrayLists have duplicate entries (and the duplicates aren't necessary for this assignment), so I got the okay from my teacher to sanitize the data by removing duplicate entries. Here's what I came up with:

private static ArrayList<String> KillDups(ArrayList<String> ListOfStrings) {  

    for (int i = 0 ; i < ListOfStrings.size(); i++) {
        for (int j = i + 1; j < ListOfStrings.size(); j++) {
            //don't start on the same word or you'll eliminate it.
            if ( ListOfStrings.get(i).toString().equalsIgnoreCase( ListOfStrings.get(j).toString() )  ) {
                ListOfStrings.remove(j);//if they are the same, DITCH ONE.
                j = j -1; //removing the word basically changes the index, so swing down one.
            }                                
        }
    }
    return ListOfStrings;
}

This is fine for my assignment, but I doubt it would be very useful in the real world. Is there a way to do this that would ignore white space and special characters during the comparison? Is there a cleaner way in general to handle this (maybe without the nested For Loops)? Is there another question I should be asking that I don't know to ask?

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1  
First: you don't need toString everywhere, since these are Strings already. For your problem: I'm sure there are good built-in ways to do this. If you wanted to write your own, you could simply sort the list and only compare adjacent entries to see if they're equal. That would give you a time complexity of O(N) (not including the O(NlogN) for sorting). –  Chris Hayes Nov 12 '12 at 1:32
    
Since quite some answer seems focused on something you haven't mentioned, it will be great if OP can clarify: 1) Do you need to keep the order of the list, after removing duplication? 2) As you are removing duplicate by ignore case comparison, do you want to keep the first or last string (or you simply don't care?) ? –  Adrian Shum Nov 12 '12 at 1:45
    
Well, in truth, the order doesn't matter in this case. But, as I would like the end result to be something more useful, it would be preferable to keep the original order. –  Elderwyrm Nov 12 '12 at 1:54
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6 Answers 6

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Yes. And it can be done in just 1 (elegant) line:

List<String> noDups = new ArrayList<String>(new LinkedHashSet<String>(list));

The intermediate Set ensures no duplicates. The LinkedHashSet implementation of Set was chosen to preserve the order of the list.


Also, on a style note:

  • name your methods and parameters with names starting with a lowercase letter
  • always refer to the abstract (ie List) rather than the concrete (ie ArrayList) when specifying method signatures

Your whole method is then:

private static List<String> killDups(List<String> list) {
    return new ArrayList<String>(new LinkedHashSet<String>(list));
}

For extra brownie points make the method generic, so it works with any type of List:

private static <T> List<T> killDups(List<T> list) {
    return new ArrayList<T>(new LinkedHashSet<T>(list));
}

If you wanted to ignore certain characters, I'd create a class for that and have a list of those. Both the hashCode() and the equals() methods are relied upon by HashSets to remove dups:

public class MungedString {
    // simplified code
    String s;

    public boolean equals(Object o) {
        // implement how you want to compare them here
    }

    public int hashCode() {
        // keep this consistent with equals()
    }
}

then

List<MungedString> list;
List<MungedString> noDupList = killDups(list);
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Thank you for the one line solution, and the additional advise! I'll do my best to earn some Brownie Points in the future. :D –  Elderwyrm Nov 12 '12 at 1:58
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Consider using Set

For the most simple case, which is direct comparison of string, using Hashset is what you would want to do:

Set<String> mySet = new HashSet<String>();

mySet.addAll(aListWithDuplciatedStrings);

then, what's inside mySet will be the unique set of strings.

For ignore-case comparison, it is the homework I left to you. Look at TreeSet and Comparator

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1  
LinkedHashSet will maintain the order of the Strings contained in the List<String>. –  Luiggi Mendoza Nov 12 '12 at 1:34
1  
yes it is, but it is not something requested by OP I believe. –  Adrian Shum Nov 12 '12 at 1:39
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You can use a HashSet instead of an ArrayList. It's a container which automatically discards duplicates. Determining if an inserted item is a duplicate or not is a constant-time operation, no matter how large the set is. So converting your ArrayList to a HashSet and back will remove all duplicates.

The downside is that the order of a HashSet is unpredictable, so when it's important to maintain the order, use a LinkedHashSet instead (which is a bit slower).

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Firstly, you could do it in a nifty one-liner with a Set:

private static ArrayList<String> KillDups(ArrayList<String> ListOfStrings) {
    return new ArrayList(new LinkedHashSet(ListOfStrings));
}

This would remove all the duplicates. The second option with a loop would be to add them into a new List:

private static ArrayList<String> KillDups(ArrayList<String> ListOfStrings) {
    ArrayList<String> newList = new ArrayList<String>();
    for(String s : ListOfStrings) {
        if(!newList.contains(s)) {
            newList.add(s);
        }
    }
    return newList
}

As for custom comparisons. I believe that there is a set that will allow you to provide a comparator, however I cannot remember it at the moment.

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import java.awt.Toolkit;
import java.util.Scanner;

class duplicate {

 public static void main(String[] args) {  

    Scanner kb = new Scanner(System. in );
    System.out.println("Entre String");
    String string = kb.nextLine();


    int length = string.length();
    if(length < 2) {
        System.out.println(string);
        return;
    }

    System.out.print(string.charAt(0));
    for (int i = 1; i < length; i++) {
        if (string.charAt(i) != string.charAt(i - 1)) {
            System.out.print(string.charAt(i));
          } 
    }
}
}
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public static void removeDuplicateString(String input) {
    String value1 = manikandan;
    String value2 = manikandan;
    String finalValue = "";
    int count = 0;
    char char1;
    char char2 = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < value1.length(); i++) {
        flag = 0;
        char1 = value1.charAt(i);
        for (int j = 0; j < value2.length(); j++) {
            char2 = value2.charAt(j);
            if (char1 == char2) {
                count++;
            }
        }

        if (count > 1) {
            finalValue=finalValue+char1;
            i=i+(count-1);
        } else {
            finalValue = finalValue + char1;
        }
        count = 0;
    }
    System.out.println(finalValue);
}

}

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