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I want to use getopt_long() to parse command-line arguments. After reading the getopt_long() man pages, I have the understanding that getopt_long() only can parse one argument after an option. Is there anyway to use getopt_long() to parse this command line like this:

./a.out -s 127.0.0.1 2012 -u stackoverflow

To give the result:

ip = 127.0.0.1
port = 2012
username = stackoverflow

Here's what I've tried:

while (1) {
    int this_option_optind = optind ? optind : 1;
    int option_index = 0;
    static struct option long_options[] = {
        {"server", required_argument, NULL, 's'},
        {"user", required_argument, NULL, 'u'},
        {0, 0, 0, 0},
    };

    c = getopt_long(argc, argv, "s:u:", long_options, &option_index);
    if (c == -1)
        break;

    switch (c) {

        case 's':
            printf("option %s", long_options[option_index].name);
            if (optarg) {
                printf(" with arg %s", optarg);
            }
            printf("\n");

        case 'u':
            printf("option %s", long_options[option_index].name);
            if (optarg) {
                printf(" with arg %s", optarg);
            }
            printf("\n");

        case '?':
            break;

        default:
            printf("?? getopt returned character code 0%o ??\n", c);
    }
}
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2  
Have you considered adding a -p/--port flag? Or just passing host:port, as is fairly standard? –  Kevin Nov 12 '12 at 2:18
    
Can you please show some code for this ? –  user265767 Nov 12 '12 at 14:09
    
... It's exactly the same as your -u and -s flags. –  Kevin Nov 12 '12 at 14:25
    
But how can i make -s depending on -p, sow when i give argument -s I also have to give argument -p ? –  user265767 Nov 12 '12 at 16:29
    
@Kevin that doesn't really answer his question. What if it was something else like --server=<server> --clients=<client1>... –  puk Nov 28 '13 at 0:09

2 Answers 2

If you'd call your program like this:

./a.out -s "127.0.0.1 2012" -u stackoverflow

you'd be getting "127.0.0.1 2012" as value for optarg in the 's' case.

share|improve this answer

The first answer is: nothing stops you from using or modifying optind. If optind < argc then optind is the index of the next common-line argument in argv, and otherwise there are no more arguments. So you can use that argument in your processing loop, but it's your responsibility:

  • to ensure that optind is in range (< argc)
  • to check whether the argument at argv[optind] is another option or not (i.e. whether it starts with a -)
  • to increment optind so that the argument you've used doesn't get rescanned by getopt.

The second answer is: you should think three times before doing something non-standard like this. Although it might seem like a bit more typing, there are good reasons to use a more standard technique, like a -p PORT option. It's easier to document, less work to implement, and less surprising for users accustomed to standard command-line option behaviour.

Finally, you're missing a number of break statements in your example code, which is why -s will be reported as also being -u.

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2  
Nicely put. An option instead of using -p port would be -s server:port. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 12 '12 at 2:20
    
Can you please show some code for this ? –  user265767 Nov 12 '12 at 14:08
    
How would you recommend reorganizing the command line options for a server/client problem? ie. synchronizing multiple instances of a video player where one is assigned the role of server, and the others are made to be the clients? –  puk Nov 28 '13 at 0:11

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