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I'm trying to get the following map working:

enum ttype { shift, reduce }
map <string, pair<ttype, int> > lookup;

So this works fine, but I need a way to check whether a key was not found. So for example, something to the effect of:

cout << (lookup["a"]==NULL) << endl; // this is wrong, but I am trying to find a way to identify when lookup["a"] does not find a corresponding value

It seems that if a key is not found, map will return the default constructed value (ex, if it was mapping to a string, it would just return the empty string, and I could just check if lookup["a"] == "" - but I have no idea what the default constructed value for std::pairs would be).

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5  
Use find. operator[] adds it if it can't find it, whereas find does not. – chris Nov 12 '12 at 3:07
    
@chris so I would do lookup.find("a"), but equal to what? – user1202422 Nov 12 '12 at 3:09
1  
To != lookup.end() or use count("a") > 0 – PiotrNycz Nov 12 '12 at 3:11
2  
@user1202422, References are great. – chris Nov 12 '12 at 3:13
3  
@user1202422 lookup.find("a") != lookup.end() – Praetorian Nov 12 '12 at 3:15

operator[] adds the item when not found and returns a default constructed item. find() doesn't return a default constructed pair but an iterator pointing to beyond the last value of your map.

auto iter = lookup.find("a");
if (iter != lookup.end()) {
    std::cout << "Key was found :)" << std::endl;
    std::pair<ttype, int> result = iter->second;
    std::cout << "Result was: " << result.second << std::endl;
} else {
    std::cout << "Key was not found" << std::endl;
    // Maybe add the key to the map?
}

Using find() is a little bit more verbose but it makes it more readable (in my opinion).

share|improve this answer
    
operator[] adds default constructed value and returns a reference to it – Basilevs Nov 27 '12 at 10:38
    
@Basilevs that is correct. I changed the description to include this information. However, I believe that using find makes the code more readable. – gvd Nov 27 '12 at 23:07
    
I'd say absence of side-effects is find's best side. – Basilevs Nov 28 '12 at 5:20

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