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I started to learn go language days ago. When I tried to start writing some fun codes, I am stuck by a strange behavior.

package main

import "fmt"

func recv(value int) {
    if value < 0 {
        return
    }

    fmt.Println(value)
    go recv(value-1)
}

func main() {
    recv(10)
}

when I run the above code, only 10 is printed. When I remove the go before the call to recv, 10 to 0 are printed out. I believe I am misusing go routine here, but I can not understand why it failed start a go routine this way.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 15 down vote accepted

When the main function returns, Go will not wait for any still existing goroutines to finish but instead just exit.

recv will return to main after the first "iteration" and because main has nothing more to do, the program will terminate.

One solution to this problem is to have a channel that signals that all work is done, like the following:

package main

import "fmt"

func recv(value int, ch chan bool) {
    if value < 0 {
        ch <- true
        return
    }

    fmt.Println(value)
    go recv(value - 1, ch)
}

func main() {
    ch := make(chan bool)
    recv(10, ch)

    <-ch
}

Here, recv will send a single boolean before returning, and main will wait for that message on the channel.

For the logic of the program, it does not matter what type or specific value you use. bool and true are just a straightforward example. If you want to be more efficient, using a chan struct{} instead of a chan bool will save you an additional byte, since empty structs do not use any memory.

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4  
For signal channels, where the type of the channel data is not important, you can use chan struct{}. An empty struct takes up no memory, while still allowing the desired behaviour. Whereas a boolean takes up one byte. –  jimt Nov 13 '12 at 11:23
1  
Yeah, to be honest I went for a bool to not make it any more complex. But yeah, an empty struct is technically better. Do you want to incorporate that in my answer or shall I edit it myself? :) –  Dominik Honnef Nov 13 '12 at 11:35
1  
It's your answer, go for it :) –  jimt Nov 13 '12 at 11:40

A sync.Waitgroup is another solution and specifically intended for the purpose of waiting for an arbitrary amount of goroutines to run their course.

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "sync"
)

func recv(value int, wg *sync.WaitGroup) {
    if value < 0 {
        return
    }

    fmt.Println(value)

    wg.Add(1) // Add 1 goroutine to the waitgroup.

    go func() {
        recv(value-1, wg)
        wg.Done() // This goroutine is finished.
    }()
}

func main() {
    var wg sync.WaitGroup
    recv(10, &wg)

    // Block until the waitgroup signals
    // all goroutines to be finished.
    wg.Wait()
}
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I did so and also worked. How come?

package main

import "fmt"

func recv(value int) {
    if value < 0 {
      return
    }

    fmt.Println(value)
    recv(value - 1)
}

func main() {
  recv(10)
}
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Did your second version print 10,9,8,7,6,5,4,3,2,1 ? Try 100 times :D –  vrbilgi Jan 10 at 14:26
1  
@vrbilgi It did not work. I was mistaken. Thank U. Edited. ;) –  Rafael Laurindo Jan 22 at 14:28

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