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This was a question in one of my books (with no answer attached to it), that I've been thinking about for a few days now. Is the answer simply that the C++ code will eventually crash because it is creating a garbage memory cell after each iteration?

Consider the following Java and C++ code fragments, parts of two versions of a GUI based application which collects user preferences and use them to assemble a command and its parameters. The method/function getUserCommandSpecification() returns a string representing the command code and its parameters. The returned string is used to build the required command which is then executed.

Assume the following:

(i) After the creation in the while loop of the Command object (referred by cmd in Java case or pointed by cmd in C++ case), the reference / pointer cmd to the generated object is no more referenced or used.

(ii) The application also defines a class Command along with its method/function execute().

a. Which of the two code versions, detailed below, will eventually crash.
b. Explain why a program version crashes while the other one is not crashing.

Java code

...
while (true) {
   String commandSpecification = getUserCommandSpecification();
   Command cmd = new Command(commandSpecification);
   cmd.execute();
}
...

C++ code

...
while (true) {
   string commandSpecification = getUserCommandSpecification();
   Command* cmd = new Command(commandSpecification);
   cmd -> execute();
}
...
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10  
Yes, the C++ snippet will eventually exhaust memory/address space. –  vladr Nov 12 '12 at 4:23
4  
Why so many upvotes? Although this is a perfectly valid question and not everyone is an expert programmer, I find it very basic and not interesting especially to the vast majority of the stackoverflow audience. –  Andreas Bonini Nov 12 '12 at 14:34
    
@AndreasBonini I am somewhat surprised myself. –  caleb.breckon Nov 12 '12 at 15:50

8 Answers 8

up vote 46 down vote accepted

Yes, the C++ version leaks due to new Command(...) with no delete. Of course it could have easily been coded differently to avoid that:

...
while (true) {
   string commandSpecification = getUserCommandSpecification();
   Command cmd(commandSpecification);
   cmd.execute();
}
...

...so I'm not sure the example is as instructive as they think.

share|improve this answer
1  
Doing it this way would be using the stack instead of the heap? –  caleb.breckon Nov 12 '12 at 4:28
11  
@caleb.breckon: The cmd may have allocated parts (just like string above it) but the allocation/free of it is by scope, so when cmd goes out of scope (at the end of every loop iteration) its destructor is called so it can free any allocated parts inside cmd. The instance of cmd itself is on the stack, though. –  Ben Jackson Nov 12 '12 at 4:29
14  
This is an important lesson for people coming from Java to C++: You should avoid using new whenever possible. And if you do have to use new, consider using one of the smart-pointer types to ensure eventual cleanup. –  Kristopher Johnson Nov 12 '12 at 10:36
1  
@Kristopher Johnson -- well done, the best comment on the best answer here! "'new' Statement Considered Harmful"... –  AAT Nov 12 '12 at 14:05
2  
New should be used mostly for dynamic allocation. For instance if you cant know the size of an object before runtime. And yes i came across a C++ project written by a Java programmer. It was horrible. Every line of code almost had a new in it. Java programmers should really learn the difference between new in Java and C++ –  roohan Nov 12 '12 at 15:02

The C++ code is creating an endless number of Command objects which are never deleted. In C++ there's no garbage collection. One must call delete on all instances that were created by new.

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2  
Or just use the stack –  Inverse Nov 13 '12 at 19:52

Using raw pointers is falling out of style. Here it is unnecessary as already pointed out. In case where a pointer was actually needed, use a std::unique_ptr.

while (true) {
   string commandSpecification = getUserCommandSpecification();
   std::unique_ptr<Command> cmd(new Command(commandSpecification));
   cmd -> execute();
}

No memory leak here.

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The C++ example will crash due to a memory leak.

Command* cmd = new Command(commandSpecification);

is continuously called without a corresponding delete.

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In C++, there is no garbage collection (except for locals within scope). Thus, the C++ continuously allocates Command objects on the heap without freeing that memory with a call to delete. Thus, the C++ program will eventually run out of memory.

In Java, the garbage collector will see that objects on the heap are no longer being referenced and free them, thus avoiding the out of memory error.

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12  
I'd rephrase that except for locals within scope part of your answer - in C++ there's no garbage collection, period. Locals are simply deleted by code generated by the compiler: instances with desctructors are destructed and then the stack pointer is simply set back to where it was before the call (ignoring a possible return value). It's not garbage collection by the common meaning of the term. –  xxbbcc Nov 12 '12 at 4:31
2  
C++ snobs sometimes call it "Garbage Prevention" ;) –  MSalters Nov 12 '12 at 13:14
1  
@MSalters Lol. :) –  xxbbcc Nov 12 '12 at 15:13

AFAIK, in C++ you need to explicitly destroy the objects you create (using the new keyword) while in Java the Garbage Collector (which helps reclaim the memory taken by the objects that are no longer reachable) takes care of it for you.

In Java, the objects created in such a manner will increase the frequency of minor GCs, so those objects probably won't even make it to the Old Generation area in the heap (depending on how long the execute runs).

Extreme Performance with Java

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4  
Only the objects you create with new, which is why you don't see that word in C++ nearly as often as you would in Java. –  Benjamin Lindley Nov 12 '12 at 4:26
    
@BenjaminLindley: Thanks for the comment. Even though I have learnt some C++ in the past, to be honest, I don't have that much of experience with it. –  Bhesh Gurung Nov 12 '12 at 4:31
1  
something needs to destroy objects you create with new, it doesn't have to be your code though e.g. smart pointers –  jk. Nov 12 '12 at 13:38

Since it has not been explicitly said yet (searching the word in the page gets no matches), I feel it's best to add: that C++ code has a blatant memory leak bug in it.

Here's one more working alternative, using std::auto_ptr (Boost's boost::scoped_ptr or Qt's QScopedPointer are alternative smart pointers):

while (true) {
   string commandSpecification = getUserCommandSpecification();
   std::auto_ptr<Command> cmd(new Command(commandSpecification));
   cmd->execute();
}
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read about garbage collection in java. in java you didn't need to delete objects manually because the jvm does it for you automatically but in c++ you need to delete objects that you didn't need else. also garbage collector is a power full tool in java if you want help it you can make reference of object to null after your work finished.

Object x=new Object()
///
.
.
.
you did your works
x=null;
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