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I have a basic question about using a nested select with the table name for the nested select being the data of a column in the first table. Here is an example of what I want to do and what query i tried but does not work.

In this example I want a query that will tell me which pets have days that they are not feed

table pets

name type feed_schedule
-----------------------
joe  dog  sched_1
sam  cat  sched_2
...

table sched_1

day  feed
---------
sun  yes
mon  no
tues yes
wed  yes
thur no
fri  yes
sat  yes




table sched_2
day  feed
---------
sun  yes
mon  yes
tues yes
wed  no
thur no
fri  yes
sat  yes


SELECT * from pets WHERE (SELECT * FROM pets.feed_schedule WHERE
                       (feed = 'yes')
                       )

This query complains that I do not have access to the table "feed_schedule" How can I accomplish this? Thank you!

share|improve this question
    
Thank you @mvp The two step process is exactly what I do now. I am looking make that process a little cleaner. My example understates the real life problem. I have a live site that has been is use for years. In reality the pet table is a table of bookings for vacation rentals. There is a table (feed_scedule) for each property that has a row for each date. Each row has the status of that home on that day, occupied, rate booked, etc So making one table with all those "schedules" seems like a very "wide" ever expanding table as more homes are added. Seems like it is not scalable. –  Matthew Castrigno Nov 13 '12 at 1:23

1 Answer 1

Your current schema calls for using dynamically generated table names. It is possible to make it work using client code or stored procedures, but it will always require two steps: first, query pets table to get name of table with schedules, and second step is to query selected schedule table. In other words, rather messy.

Instead, I would recommend changing your schema to have single table schedules to hold all schedules, something like this:

CREATE TABLE schedules (
    schedule_id INT NOT NULL,
    feed_day VARCHAR(4),
    feed VARCHAR(3)
)

All your existing schedules are to be saved into this table. Also, each pet should have integer schedule_id saved in it.

Now, you can use simple join to get your results, something like this:

SELECT p.name
FROM pets p, schedules s
WHERE p.schedule_id = s.schedule_id
  AND s.feed = 'yes'
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you @mvp The two step process is exactly what I do now. I am looking make that process a little cleaner. My example understates the real life problem. I have a live site that has been is use for years. In reality the pet table is a table of bookings for vacation rentals. There is a table (feed_scedule) for each property that has a row for each date. Each row has the status of that home on that day, occupied, rate booked, etc So making one table with all those "schedules" seems like a very "wide" ever expanding table as more homes are added. Seems like it is not scalable. –  Matthew Castrigno Nov 13 '12 at 1:24
    
I have seen the phrase "dynamically generated table names" before, is this a concept only or are there resources to do this? My ultimate goal with this query is to find errors in the data base where homes have their dates shown as occupied or vice versa –  Matthew Castrigno Nov 13 '12 at 1:25
    
About scalability - quite the opposite. If you have that big table with proper indexes created, accessing it should not be slow, no matter how big that table is. If you artificially split this table into pieces, you still need to perform extra lookup, and price for that lookup is still slightly bigger than to lookup once in huge table –  mvp Nov 13 '12 at 3:56

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