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I'm trying to use only specific part of the base class, while hiding other parts. Consider the following code:

struct IX
{
    // ...
};

struct IY
{
    // ...
};

class Base :
    public IX,
    public IY
{
    // Implements IX and IY.
    // ...
};


// Reuse IX implementation, but don't expose IY.
//
class X : protected Base
{
public:
    using Base::IX; // <-- Doesn't exist in C++.
};

Can I enjoy the IX implementation provided by Base, but without exposing IY interface?

Of course, I could type using Base::IX::xxx for all methods, which exist in IX. Alternatively, I could forward all calls to implementation like this:

//
class X : public IX
{
public:
    // Forward all calls to IX methods to m_p.
    // ...

protected:
    Base* m_p;
};

But again, I have to type all methods available in IX in order to forward them. And every time IX changes, I'll have to update X.

Thanks.

Alex

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1 Answer 1

Well basically implementation of IX and IY is protected in your class X. You can expose accessors and modifiers as public methods inside your class.

Another approach would be to expose publicly IX from Base:

class Base : public IX, protected IY
{
    // Implements IX and IY.
    // ...
    // Expose access to IY through base for the class 
    // inheriting from Base
};

class X : public Base 

Another possibility is not to inherit from IX and IY but to keep them as public members of your Base:

class Base
{
public:
    IX member1;
    IY member2;
};

This way you can inherit protectedly from Base and can expose a single accessor and modifier method from your class X for member1.

share|improve this answer
    
@konstantin-d-infragistics IX and Base already exist and used in other places. Also, IX contains quite a lot of things like typedef's, nested classes, etc. So, modifying X every time when IX changes can be a daunting task. –  Alex Blekhman Nov 12 '12 at 6:41
    
@AlexBlekhman I have made and edit and there are two suggestions. The first one still assumes that you would have to change Base if you change IY. The second one does not require changes. –  Konstantin Dinev Nov 12 '12 at 6:45
    
Thanks for the answer. However, in order to use the second variant I'll have to implement IX and IY first. So, Base will have members like IXImpl and IYImpl. It makes usage of Base for other users quite cumbersome. I tend to think that the problem doesn't have clean solution in C++. So, inheriting from IX and forwarding all calls internally probably is the least dirty way to solve it. –  Alex Blekhman Nov 12 '12 at 7:34

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