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I have a file that I am entering into a MySQL table. The file, sadly, contains double quotes (") and backslashes (). I have figured out a way, in Perl, to find and replace the double quotes (or so I think), but can't seem to figure out how to remove all the silly backslashes.

Does anyone have any ideas? Here is what the snippet looks like... sorry I am such a noob I am still learning!

open(FILE,$fileName) || die("Cannot Open File");
my(@fcont) = <FILE>;
close FILE;

my $searchStr1=qq{"};
my $replaceStr1=qq{ };

open(FOUT,">$fileName") || die("Cannot Open File");
foreach $line (@fcont) {
    $line =~ s/$searchStr1/$replaceStr1/g;
    print FOUT $line;
}

#not sure if searching for backslash will work
my $searchStr2="\\";
my $replaceStr2=qq{ };

open(FOUT,">$fileName") || die("Cannot Open File");
foreach $line (@fcont) {
    $line =~ s/$searchStr2/$replaceStr2/g;
    print FOUT $line;
}

close FOUT;
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3  
1. please work on your accept rate. 2. are you inserting the file via perl or mysql cmdline? –  tuxuday Nov 12 '12 at 7:21
    
When replacing backslashes, you have to consider double quoting issues. Put the match pattern directly into the s/// operator to remove any such possibility. –  amon Nov 12 '12 at 7:27
    
Hi there, not sure what accept rate is or how to improve it.... also, I am playing with the file in perl before I parse it into my mySQL database. Thanks! –  user1026801 Nov 16 '12 at 6:45
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3 Answers 3

If you put the search pattern in a double-quoted variable, you need to double up on the backslashes:

my $searchStr2="\\\\";

The variable will then contain \\, so the regexp still gets two backslashes, the first one escaping the second one so that it will match a literal backslash.

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replace " or \ with blank

$line =~ s/"|\\/ /g;
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When substituting one literal string for another, it is more efficient to use tr/// instead of s///g:

$line =~ tr{"\\}{' };
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