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I have the following code in a module:

-module(my_server).

-record(server_opts,
        {port,
     ip="127.0.0.1",
     max_connections=10}).

Opts1 = #server_opts{port=80}.

and when i try to compile it in Erlang shell it gives an error like syntax error before Opts1. Any idea what could be the problem with the code above. Please note that the code is taken from the following website: Record example in Erlang

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The following line:

Opts1 = #server_opts{port=80}.

Should be contained within a function body:

foo() ->
    Opts1 = #server_opts{port=80},
    ...

Remember to export the function, so that you can call it from outside the module:

-export([test_records/0]).

A complete example follows:

-module(my_server).

-export([test_records/0]).

-record(server_opts, {port,
                      ip = "127.0.0.1",
                      max_connections = 10}).

test_records() ->
    Opts1 = #server_opts{port=80},
    Opts1#server_opts.port.
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Hi Roberto, is this because of avoiding side effects? –  coffeMug Nov 12 '12 at 8:06
1  
It's because of how modules work in Erlang. A module contains a sequence of attributes (module name, list of exported functions, record definitions, etc.) and of function declarations. To execute a piece of Erlang code, you need an entry point (the function declaration). –  Roberto Aloi Nov 12 '12 at 8:09
    
Thanks! :) I wonder why in the example nothing has been mentioned about this. And that is why i was confused with record usages. –  coffeMug Nov 12 '12 at 8:14

Maybe, you've thought that Opts1 is a global constant, but there are no global variables in erlang.

You may use macro definitions to have something like global constants (which are actually replaced in compile time):

-module(my_server).

-record(server_opts,
        {port,
     ip="127.0.0.1",
     max_connections=10}).

%% macro definition:    
-define(Opts1, #server_opts{port=80}).

%% and use it anywhere in your code:

my_func() ->
     io:format("~p~n",[?Opts1]).

P.S. Using records from shell. Assume - you've created file my_server.hrl which contain definition of record server_opts. First of all you're have to load record definition, using function rr("name_of_file_with_record_definition"), after this you're ready to work with records in shell:

1> rr("my_record.hrl").
[server_opts]
2> 
2> Opts1 = #server_opts{port=80}.
#server_opts{port = 80,ip = "127.0.0.1",
             max_connections = 10}
3> 
3> Opts1.
#server_opts{port = 80,ip = "127.0.0.1",
             max_connections = 10}
4> 
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So in general i will always need a function in order to make use of the records; right? –  coffeMug Nov 12 '12 at 10:34
    
Yes, you always need wrap execution of code in functions (except erlang shell session, where you may create variables and assign them values without wrapping them to functions - look at edit of my answer). –  stemm Nov 12 '12 at 10:53
1  
I would like to add that in shell you can also define records using command rd: e.g. 5> rd(person, {name, surname}). By the way, as stated above, in erlang your variables must be inside a function..well, if you don't consider erlang macros erlang.org/doc/reference_manual/macros.html –  user601836 Nov 12 '12 at 13:32

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