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Following is a table structure in my system. The scenario is, system has Clients. Clients can be many type, for exampel: a Person, a Company, a Bank or etc. I have come with a database design as follows.

TABLE : CLIENT

===============================
| ID    | NAME_CODE | TYPE    |
-------------------------------
| 1000  | Martin    | PERSON  |
| 1002  | George    | PERSON  |
| 1003  | Max_Group | COMPANY |
-------------------------------

TABLE : PERSON

==================================================
|  ID | CLIENT_ID  | FIRST_NAME   | LAST_NAME    |
--------------------------------------------------
| 1   | 1001       | Martin       | XXXXXXXXXXX  |
| 2   | 1002       | George       | XXXXXXXXXXX  |
--------------------------------------------------

TABLE : COMPANY

===================================================
| ID | CLIENT_ID  | NAME           | Location     |
---------------------------------------------------
| 1  | 1003       | Max Group Inc. | XXXXXXXXXXX  |
---------------------------------------------------

EDIT : ID added for PERSON and COMPANY tables.

I welcome if any one could suggest me a better structure.

For the above structure, I need to creat the class model. Following is what I have created.

class Client
{
   int ID;
   string NameCode;
}

class Person : Client
{
    int ID;
    int ClientId;
    string FirstName;
    stirng LastName;
    //........
}

class Company : Client
{
    int ID;
    int ClientId;
    string Name;
    string Location;
    //.........
}

I feel the above model are not suitable. There can be a right way for this. Please suggest me a better way.

share|improve this question
    
is the number of types of clients variable? Like would you have something else added besides person, bank and company? –  nawfal Nov 12 '12 at 8:25
    
No. it is fixed at design time itself. –  BlueBird Nov 12 '12 at 8:27
    
In that case why do you want a client table at all? –  nawfal Nov 12 '12 at 8:29
    
Yes, there are number of types of clients. At the end all are client. I need to maintain a specific ID for all client and they should be able to reference in other activities in other tables. ex: another tale named 'JOB_REQUEST' it will have the reference to client (ClientId). Using this reference I should be able to load the correct model of it. You can suggest a better way. –  BlueBird Nov 12 '12 at 8:37
    
Muneer, in the end they all are different objects for you. They can be all clients but thats for application logic. Why would u want to have a common id field for them? My idea is to have separate id for them. To ensure different id for person and bank from your db side is more work (may even slow down your queries) with no major benefit. Do you see any benefit? –  nawfal Nov 12 '12 at 8:42

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

After some discussion, I think your tables are well designed.

I would design your tables this way:

TABLE : CLIENT

==============================
| ID   | NAME_CODE | TYPE    |
------------------------------
| 1    | Martin    | 1       |
| 2    | George    | 1       |
| 3    | Max_Group | 2       |
------------------------------

where Type is an Enum rather than anything hard-coded so that queries are faster.

TABLE : PERSON

============================================
| CLIENT_ID  | FIRST_NAME   | LAST_NAME    |
--------------------------------------------
| 1          | Martin       | XXXXXXXXXXX  |
| 2          | George       | XXXXXXXXXXX  |
--------------------------------------------

TABLE : COMPANY

==============================================
| CLIENT_ID  | NAME           | Location     |
----------------------------------------------
| 3          | Max Group Inc. | XXXXXXXXXXX  |
----------------------------------------------

And the classes would look like:

class Client
{
   int ID;
   string NameCode;
    //........
}

class Person : Client
{
    string FirstName;
    stirng LastName;
    //........
}

class Company : Client
{
    string Name;
    string Location;
    //.........
}

The Client table has the parent id now for every client entity. It could have been reversed by having individual id for persons and banks and then reference a foreign key in the parent client table which I believe is easier to operate from db point of view (that scales well if you're going for composition). But in the application I love inheritance and polymorphism, so the straight adaptation of it for db design is what I posted.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes @nawfel, Its fine. I am gonna use these class structure in a Business Model. I think I can make the class 'Client' as abstract. Also I can use the class 'Client' to inject as template while testing. What do you suggest? –  BlueBird Nov 12 '12 at 12:14
    
Yes I wanted to suggest that. Client has to be abstract since it doesn't mean anything alone. I am not thorough with testing, so I do not know –  nawfal Nov 13 '12 at 10:27

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