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I'm trying to understand enumerators using following example

public class Garage : IEnumerable
{
    private Car[] cars = new Car[4];
    public Garage()
    {
        cars[0] = new Car() { Id = Guid.NewGuid(), Name = "Mazda 3", CurrentSpeed = 90 };
        cars[1] = new Car() { Id = Guid.NewGuid(), Name = "Mazda 6", CurrentSpeed = 80 };
    }

    public IEnumerator GetEnumerator()
    {
        // return the array object's IEnumerator
        return cars.GetEnumerator();
    }
}

static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        IEnumerator i = cars.GetEnumerator();
        i.MoveNext();
        Car myCar = (Car)i.Current;
        Console.WriteLine("{0} is going {1} km/h", myCar.Name, myCar.CurrentSpeed);
        Console.ReadLine();

    }

How can I display on console second car without looping using foreach?

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1  
Why do you want to avoid forach? –  PVitt Nov 12 '12 at 8:22
    
Do i.MoveNext(); twice? –  Sergey Berezovskiy Nov 12 '12 at 8:23
    
just for learning purposes, I want to move forward using MoveNext() and display object state. –  user1765862 Nov 12 '12 at 8:23
1  
I would implement IEnumerable<Car> –  Tim Schmelter Nov 12 '12 at 8:23
1  
use while (i.MoveNext()) –  StringBuilder Nov 12 '12 at 8:25

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted
foreach (Car myCar in cars)
{
    Console.WriteLine("{0} is going {1} km/h", myCar.Name, myCar.CurrentSpeed);
}

expands approximately to

IEnumerator i = cars.GetEnumerator();
while (i.MoveNext())
{
    Car myCar = (Car)i.Current;
    Console.WriteLine("{0} is going {1} km/h", myCar.Name, myCar.CurrentSpeed);
}

(In reality, the expansion of the foreach statement performed by the C# compiler is a bit more complicated; see The foreach statement.)

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4  
missed the using/Dispose()... very important and it gets commonly omitted (incorrectly) –  Marc Gravell Nov 12 '12 at 8:34
IEnumerator i = cars.GetEnumerator();
i.MoveNext();
Car firstCar = (Car)i.Current;
i.MoveNext();
Car secondCar = (Car)i.Current;
share|improve this answer
3  
missed the using/Dispose()... very important and it gets commonly omitted (incorrectly) –  Marc Gravell Nov 12 '12 at 8:35

You can expose an indexer to access your inner array:

public class Garage : IEnumerable
{
  public Car this[int i]
  {
    return this.cars[i];
  }
}

This is not an enumerator, since enumerators in C# are quite exclusively used to iterate over elements sequentially rather than randomly. But given you're using an array to store your cars it is fine to expose an indexer.

By the way you might want to implement the generic IEnumerable<Car> interface to make it explicit and type-safe that one can iterate over Car objects.

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You can use:

cars.Skip(1).Take(1).Single();

to have the second car ( you skip the first and then take just one);

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The IEnumerator class is ment to be used with the foreach loop. It is not possible to access the second item without the foreach loop. (Unless you dive deep into toe internal structures of C#, not advised to do.)

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2  
-1. Exploring the internal structures of IEnumerable is exactly what the OP is trying to do, and I find his attitude absolutely recommendable. It's always good to have a 'look under the hood' and understand how things work. –  Treb Nov 12 '12 at 8:42

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