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Lets say I've got something like the following:

class A { virtual void g() = 0 }

class B : public A { virtual void g() { ... } }
class C : public A { virtual void g() { ... } }

... f(bool x)
{
  if (x) { return B(); } else { return C(); }
}

bool get_boolean();

int main()
{
  bool b = get_boolean();
  ... x = f(b);
  x.g();
}

Is there anyway to do something like the above without calls to new, i.e. solely on the stack?

share|improve this question
    
Does std::unique_ptr qualify ? –  Alexandre C. Nov 12 '12 at 8:53
1  
U dont need new to make a pointer.. –  Karthik T Nov 12 '12 at 8:57

9 Answers 9

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In function f objects B() or C() are both temporary, so you can only return them from f by value.

Maybe boost::variant is for you. Then you don't even need to have the method virtual or derive from a common base class.

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But which requires you to do an if each time you want to access the object. –  James Kanze Nov 12 '12 at 10:36
    
@James Kanze: No, you can use visitors. –  Juraj Blaho Nov 12 '12 at 10:56
    
It's morally equivalent, the benefit of visitors is elsewhere (e.g. each visitor must have a plan for each possible active member of the variant, there is no forgetting a case). –  Luc Danton Nov 12 '12 at 19:58

A simple way to avoid dynamic allocation is to use static allocation, which is about as opposite from dynamic allocation as possible. It must be done carefully however, because even with a non-threaded program one can inadvertently get into a situation where two or more parts of the code each think that they “own” some statically allocated object. Worse, such essentially global variables (even when disguised as singletons, or in the code below as local statics) essentially serve as central hubs for spaghetti communication, where chaos-inducing information is freely propagated between places that you could never imagine, totally out of your control.

So, the static allocation scheme has some drawbacks… :-)

But let’s start there:

// Using static allocation.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

struct A { virtual void g() = 0; };

struct B : A { virtual void g() override { wcout << "A\n"; } };
struct C : A { virtual void g() override { wcout << "B\n"; } };

A& f( bool const x )
{
    static B    theB;
    static C    theC;

    if( x ) { theB = B(); return theB; } else { theC = C(); return theC; }
}

bool get_boolean() { return false; }

int main()
{
    bool const b = get_boolean();
    A& x = f( b ); 
    x.g();
}

To avoid the mistaken-ownership drawback of the static allocation scheme, you can provide the storage on the stack, using C++ automatic allocation (C++ automatic allocation is a stack by definition, a LIFO allocation scheme). But this means passing the storage down to the function. The function can then return a reference to the relevant object:

// Using automatic storage (the stack)

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

struct A { virtual void g() = 0; };

struct B : A { virtual void g() override { wcout << "A\n"; } };
struct C : A { virtual void g() override { wcout << "B\n"; } };

A& f( bool const x, B& b, C& c )
{
    if( x ) { b = B(); return b; } else { c = C(); return c; }
}

bool get_boolean() { return false; }

int main()
{
    bool const b = get_boolean();
    B   objBStorage;
    C   objCStorage;
    A&  x   = f( b, objBStorage, objCStorage ); 
    x.g();
}

But even when we choose to ignore issues such as construction with side effects, and so on, i.e. when we blithely assume that classes B and C are designed to work well with such a scheme, the above wastes storage. If B and C instances are large, one may therefore consider using C++’s facilities for constructing objects in pre-existing storage, known as placement new. Due to memory alignment issues it’s a bit difficult to do correctly in C++03, but C++11 offers better support, as follows:

#include <iostream>
#include <memory>           // unique_ptr
#include <new>              // new
#include <type_traits>      // aligned_storage
using namespace std;

typedef unsigned char Byte;

struct A { virtual void g() = 0; };

struct B : A { virtual void g() override { wcout << "A\n"; } };
struct C : A { virtual void g() override { wcout << "B\n"; } };

A* f( bool const x, void* storage )
{
    return (x? static_cast<A*>( ::new( storage ) B() ) : ::new( storage ) C());
}

bool get_boolean() { return false; }

void destroyA( A* p ) { p->~A(); }

int main()
{
    enum{ enoughBytes = 
        (sizeof( B ) > sizeof( C ))? sizeof( B ) : sizeof( C ) };
    typedef aligned_storage< enoughBytes >::type StorageForBOrC;

    bool const b = get_boolean();
    StorageForBOrC storage;
    A* const pX = f( b, &storage );
    unique_ptr<A, void(*)(A*)> const cleanup( pX, destroyA );
    pX->g();
}

Now, which of the above would I choose?

Would I choose the severely restricted but simple and instant static allocation, or would I choose the memory-wasting automatic allocation, or perhaps … the optimized but somewhat complex in-place object construction?

The answer is, I would choose none of them!

Instead of focusing on micro-efficiency I would focus on clarity and correctness, and therefore simply take the performance hit of a dynamic allocation. For correctness I would use a smart pointer for the function result. If this turned out to really be slowing things down, I would perhaps consider using a dedicated small objects allocator.

In conclusion, don’t fret the small stuff! :-)

share|improve this answer

Polymorphism also works on references, but you can't return a temporary by reference, so:

A& f(bool x)
{
  static B b;
  static C c;
  if (x) { return b; } else { return c; }
}

and

A& x = f(b);
share|improve this answer
4  
This means that 1) you construct both objects, even if you only use one, and 2) each call to the function returns a reference to the same object, rather than a new instance. (Point 2 is probably OK if the object is immutable, but not otherwise.) –  James Kanze Nov 12 '12 at 10:38

Is there something i am missing in the question? Why not something simple like below

void CallGFunc(A *obj){
   obj->g();
}

int main(){
    ....
    B b;
    C c;

    CallGFunc(booleanvar? &b:&c)
    ....
}

Is this what you want?

share|improve this answer

Is there anyway to do something like the above without calls to new, i.e. solely on the stack?

You could just use placement new. This allows you to specify a memory location for your object (e.g. in a char buffer you declare on the stack).


Example: http://www.parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/placement-new.html

share|improve this answer
2  
Careful with the alignment! –  R. Martinho Fernandes Nov 12 '12 at 9:09
    
@R.MartinhoFernandes yes +1 -- the link also warns of this. –  justin Nov 12 '12 at 9:14
    
And where do you get the memory for the placement new? It can't be on the stack, because the memory will be freed when you return from the function, and if it is static, you can only call the function once. Which leaves dynamic, which is what you get with new. –  James Kanze Nov 12 '12 at 10:31

I would refactor it to use a function argument:

class A { virtual void g() = 0 }

class B : public A { virtual void g() { ... } }
class C : public A { virtual void g() { ... } }

template<typename FunOb>
typename std::result_of<FunOb(A&)>::type f(bool x, FunOb fo)
{
  if (x) { B b; return fo(b); } else { C c; return fo(c); }
}

bool get_boolean();

int main()
{
  bool b = get_boolean();
  f(b, [](A& x) { x.g(); } );
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's fine if all you need is a temporary object, for one function call. It works less well if his x.g() was just a placeholder, for more complicated operations. –  James Kanze Nov 12 '12 at 10:35

You can use object references, however you can't return a reference to an object created in the stack, as the object will be deleted as soon as the call is finished.

Here is one suggestion:

#include <iostream>

class A
{
public:
virtual void g() const = 0;
};

class B : public A
{
public:
virtual void g() const {std::cout << "B" << std::endl;};
};

class C : public A
{
public:
virtual void g() const {std::cout << "C" << std::endl;};
};

const A &f(bool b)
{
  if (b) return B(); else return C();
}

void doStuff(const A &a)
{
  a.g();
}

int main(void)
{
  doStuff(B()); //"B"
  doStuff(C()); //"C"

//  A &a = f(true); //ERROR! a will be deleted right after call is made, giving you a reference to an invalid object!

return 0;
}

Another solution is to return the reference of a static object, just keep in mind that object will be shared by all instances calling that method. Works well you don't have to modify the object, but otherwise it's not a good solution.

#include <iostream>

class A
{
public:
virtual void g() const = 0;
};

class B : public A
{
public:
virtual void g() const {std::cout << "B" << std::endl;};
};

class C : public A
{
public:
virtual void g() const {std::cout << "C" << std::endl;};
};

const A &f(bool b)
{
static B ret1;
static C ret2;
   if (b) return ret1; else return ret2;
}


void doStuff(const A &a)
{
  a.g();
}

int main(void)
{
  doStuff(f(true)); //"B"
  doStuff(f(false)); //"C"

return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
The first program has Undefined Behavior, returning a reference to a temporary. Note that ref-to-const as function result type, does not prolong the lifetime of a temporary in the return expression. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Nov 12 '12 at 11:43

Not really. The problem is that the copy operation is not polymorphic; if your function returns an A, then only an A will be copied. (This is called slicing.) Without copy, you need an arbitrary lifetime of the object, not one which is based on scope. And about the only other possibility which is generally available is dynamic allocation.

If the function is called only once, and the object is more or less a singleton, you can use static instances, although you'll probably want to define them in separate scopes, to avoid systematically constructing both of them:

A*
f( bool c )
{
    A* results = NULL;
    if ( c ) {
        static B b;
        results = &b;
    } else {
        static C c;
        results = &c;
    }
    return results;
}

And of course, there is always the letter-envelop idiom for combining copy with polymorphism. But this results in even more dynamic allocations in practice, even if they all occur "under the hood", so the client code doesn't see them. (If the object is immutable, the letter-envelop idiom could use a reference counted pointer, and avoid most of the additional allocations.)

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If you really want to keep everything on the stack, you would be better of writing a function which handles an A interface, and call it on the object you want :

void actionsWithA(A& a){
    a.g();
}

void doItWithB(){
    B b;
    actionsWithA(b);
}

void doItWithC(){
    C c;
    actionsWithA(c);
}

bool get_boolean();

int main()
{
    bool b = get_boolean();
    if(b) { doItWithB(); } else { doItWithC(); }
}
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