Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

check even number - OK

if [ $(( $n % 2 )) -eq 0 ]
then
  echo "$n is even number"
fi

how to check odd number ?

if [ $(( $n % ????? )) -eq 0 ]
then
  echo "$n is odd number"
fi

Thank

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

Use "not equal 0":

if [ $(( $n % 2)) -ne 0 ]
then
    echo "$n is odd"
fi

See also: http://tldp.org/LDP/abs/html/comparison-ops.html

You can also use "n%2 equals 1" since the remainder of an odd number divided by two is one:

if [ $(( $1 % 2)) -eq 1 ]
then
    echo "$1 is odd"
fi

But the former (not equal 0) is the more general case, so I would prefer it.

share|improve this answer
    
Negated expressions can take a bit of practice to get comfortable with in the beginning, but when you do, they are invaluable. +1 –  Jite Nov 12 '12 at 9:25

All the answers above use a single square bracket [ which is outdated in bash (we're talking about bash, right?). The best practice to achieve the determination of an odd or even number n is:

if (( n%2==0 )); then
    printf "%d is even\n" $n
else
    printf "%d is odd\n" $n
fi

or, as the OP wants it, i.e., check if n is odd:

if (( n%2 )); then
    printf "%d is odd\n" $n
fi
share|improve this answer
    
A little whitespace would help: (( n%2 == 0 )) –  glenn jackman Nov 12 '12 at 18:20
    
@glennjackman It's not mandatory at all! –  gniourf_gniourf Nov 12 '12 at 18:51
    
true. however writing code for readability and maintainability is important. –  glenn jackman Nov 12 '12 at 19:01
echo -n "Enter numnber : "
read n 
rem=$(( $n % 2 )) 
if [ $rem -eq 0 ]then  
   echo "$n is even number"
else  
  echo "$n is odd number"
fi
share|improve this answer

I prefer the simplicity of:

x=8; ((x%2)) || echo even

x=7; ((x%2)) && echo odd
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.