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I've got a problem with a bog standard three tier project using MVC that I'm trying to use Ninject with. I've got a MemberRepository:

public class MemberRepository : IMemberRepository{
     public bool Save(Member member){
          //saves member
     }
}

I then have my Service Layer:

public class MemberService : IMemberService{
     public bool Register(string email){
        //Do Stuff & Populate Member Object
        _repo.Save(member);
     }
}

Given I'll be using Ninject what is the best way of me setting up my AccountController. Should I pass in the MemberService to the constructor like so:

public class AccountController : Controller
{
    IMemberService _memberService;

    public AccountController(IMemberService memberService)
    {
        _memberService = memberService;
    }
}

Or pass in the repository:

public class AccountController : Controller
{
    IMemberService _memberService;

    public AccountController(IMemberRepository memberRepo)
    {
        _memberService = new MemberService(memberRepo);
    }
}

Or Both?

I originally had just a repository (no service layer) but I've had to implement a service layer and I'm not sure how I'd handle the 'dependency' when registering the kernal in my NinjectWebCommon.cs file. Which was originally just this:

    kernel.Bind<IMemberRepository>().To<SqlMemberRepository>();

But now I'm wondering if I need to register the IMemberService and have the repo as some kind of parameter.

:s Feeling kind of lost. Hope I'm making sense and someone can help out.

share|improve this question
    
Since the service and the repository are both dependencies It's best practice to inject them both in your controller. –  Preben Huybrechts Nov 12 '12 at 12:46

1 Answer 1

I've never used Ninject, I've been using Unity, but the same principles exist so hopefully this might help.

The service layer is the thing that is exposed to the controller - the controller needs to know nothing about the underlying repository. The flow is as follows, and each layer doesn't know about the layers above it:

Controller -> Service > Repository

So I would go with option 1, and then inject the repository into the constructor of the service.

public class MemberService : IMemberService {
     private readonly IMemberRepository _repo;

     [Inject]
     public MemberService (IMemberRepository repo){
        this._repo = repo;
     }

     public bool Register(string email){
        //Do Stuff & Populate Member Object
        _repo.Save(member);
     }
}

and

public class AccountController : Controller
{
    private readonly IMemberService _memberService;

    [Inject]
    public AccountController(IMemberService memberService)
    {
        _memberService = memberService;
    }
}

That example obviously uses constructor injection but you can use property/field injection if you want instead. When you register your dependencies, you'll have to register both:

kernel.Bind<IMemberRepository>().To<SqlMemberRepository>();
kernel.Bind<IMemberService>().To<MemberService>();
share|improve this answer
    
Will give it a whirl. Thanks Ian. –  lloydphillips Nov 12 '12 at 23:39
    
How did you get on? Any luck? –  Ian Routledge Nov 16 '12 at 9:33

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