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(disclaimer: this question is much simpler than the title suggests!)

I have a re-occuring problem in my program architecture with listening to changes against a model.

I have set-up some collections (much like in Backbone.js) which are just lightweight classes built around an array. The collection is a collection of models. When the user makes changes to a model I keep ending up with dreadful nested events. This is a typical, simple, scenario that I'm trying to avoid:

$("#user-details").on("click", "#save", onSaveClick);

function onSaveClick()
{       
    var givennames = $("#givenname").val(),

    // Get the model from the collection
    var user = users.get($(this).attr("data-id"));

    // set the property
    user.set("GivenNames", givennames);

    // listen for the save event
    $(user).on("save", function(){
        // Alert the view
    });

    user.save();    // save event triggers a "save" event on the model
}

If the same user is saved twice the event gets added/fired multiple times. Is there a better pattern for this?

Should the event be bubbling up through the collection and handled that way perhaps?

Here's an actual example (the one I'm most ashamed of)

$("#user-devices").on("click", ".device button", function(){

            var button = $(this),
                deviceId = $(this).closest(".device").attr("data-id"),
                device = userDevices.get(deviceId);


            $(device).on("activate", function(event, device){

                button.removeClass("btn-danger").addClass("btn-success")

                $("#activation-dialog").modal("show");
            })

            if (device.get("Active") === "1")
            {
                $("#reactivation-warning-dialog").modal("show");
                $("#reactivation-warning-dialog .btn-primary").on("click", function(){
                    device.activate();
                });

            }
            else
            {
                device.activate();  
            }
        });
share|improve this question
    
have you considered using a pre-built framework like knockout.js for binding data and UI together. I'm a recent convert and I'm very impressed! –  Alnitak Nov 12 '12 at 10:32
    
@Alnitak Yes, I am very keen to use Knockout.js it looks great. Problem is work wont give me the time to learn it and port over the existing code. I think knockout would probably halve the code I've written and solve 70% of the bugs. I'll probably learn it in my own time and put forward the idea when I'm competent with it. –  CrimsonChin Nov 12 '12 at 10:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could just check if the save event is already binded, in that case not bind it again, like this:

// if no 'save' event already binded
if (!$(user).data('events') || !$(user).data('events').save) { 
    // listen for the save event
    $(user).on("save", function(){
        // Alert the view
    });
}

See working example


To put some sugar on top, we can make the "check if event exist" logic into a custom jquery pseudo-selector, that would be defined as follows:

$.expr[':'].hasEvent = function(obj, idx, meta, stack) {
    return ($(obj).data('events') != undefined 
            && $(obj).data('events')[meta[3]] != undefined);
};

Then you can use it this way:

$(user).not(":hasEvent(save)").on("save", function(){
     // Alert the view
});

Working example


UPDATE FOR JQUERY >= 1.8

Starting with jQuery 1.8 there were some changes to the events object which makes my above code not to work, see this excerpt from the jQuery 1.8 release notes:

$(element).data(“events”): In version 1.6, jQuery separated its internal data from the user’s data to prevent name collisions. However, some people were using the internal undocumented “events” data structure so we made it possible to still retrieve that via .data(). This is now removed in 1.8, but you can still get to the events data for debugging purposes via $._data(element, "events"). Note that this is not a supported public interface; the actual data structures may change incompatibly from version to version.

So here I post the jQuery >= 1.8 updated versions for of my above examples:

Checking if the save event is already binded, in that case not bind it again:

// if no 'save' event already binded
if (!$._data(user, 'events') || !$._data(user, 'events').save) { 
    // listen for the save event
    $(user).on("save", function(){
        // Alert the view
    });
}

And the custom jquery pseudo-selector:

$.expr[':'].hasEvent = function(obj, idx, meta, stack) {
    return ($._data(obj, 'events') != undefined 
            && $._data(obj, 'events')[meta[3]] != undefined);
};
share|improve this answer
    
just saw the sugar stuff, thats cool! –  CrimsonChin Nov 20 '12 at 13:59
    
For anyone having problems with this in jQuery >= 1.8 use: $._data((user), 'events') –  CrimsonChin Nov 23 '12 at 11:10
    
Hi Nelson, that nice piece of sugar you wrote doens't work in jQuery 1.82. I cant figure out why even applying the changes I noted above –  CrimsonChin Nov 23 '12 at 11:23
    
@CrimsonChin For jQuery >= 1.8 it should be $._data($(user).get(0), 'events') or just $._data(user, 'events') . –  Nelson Apr 18 '13 at 11:11

I agree that the nested listener is a little weird--after all, you're already in a save listener, just for the button click rather than the model object.

I think I'd rewrite the code something like this:

$("#user-devices").on("click", ".device button", function(){

    var button = $(this),
        deviceId = $(this).closest(".device").attr("data-id"),
        device = userDevices.get(deviceId);

    if (device.get("Active") === "1")
    {
        $("#reactivation-warning-dialog").modal("show");
        $("#reactivation-warning-dialog .btn-primary").on("click", device.activate);

    }
    else
    {
        device.activate();
    }
});

//in the device "class"
{ 
   ...
   ...

   activate: function() {
     //persist and stuf.

     //on success...
     this.render();
   }

   render: function() {
      button.removeClass("btn-danger").addClass("btn-success");
      $("#activation-dialog").modal("show");
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Although what your suggesting is a much cleaner approach my problem is due to the asynchronouse nature of the save. Hence the the dependency of listeners everywhere –  CrimsonChin Nov 12 '12 at 9:56
    
Gotcha. Not sure exactly where you're data's flowing back to, but it seems like the basic goal is to register render() as the save() callback in only one place. So maybe you can register it in the save() method itself? –  Ethan Nov 12 '12 at 10:04
    
See edited version. –  Ethan Nov 12 '12 at 10:07
    
The model is used in multiple views, however, thats not a bad idea. I could achieve something very similar with callbacks. Might be better than using listeners –  CrimsonChin Nov 12 '12 at 10:14
1  
I accepted Nelsons answer just because it answered the "core" of the original question. But thanks for your time Ethan some really good ideas to take away here –  CrimsonChin Nov 12 '12 at 10:47

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