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I'm actually working on a tool that need some configuration before it can be used. To save some time a hard coded some values into the text boxes of the configuration tab, so I don't have to renter them every time I do some testing or debugging.

As we're using TFS to manage our solutions I'm wondering if there is a way to mark those hard coded elements in some way so that TFS or Visual Studio 2008 will remind me to remove/replace them before I do a check in.

UPDATE:

The todo comments won't be a real solution as we're already using it to mark code segments which have to be reworked. We use it as a reminder for longterm tasks. And we have plenty of them so this might become a little bit unclear.

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Maybe consider editing your question to include the fact that todo comments won't work for your situation. Just an idea... –  Jagd Aug 26 '09 at 18:35
    
Yes, you're right! –  Flo Aug 26 '09 at 19:10
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3 Answers 3

Some options:

  1. write a custom checkin policy
  2. use the existing FxCop checkin policy and write a custom rule (if you're marking TODOs with something that gets actually compiled, like an Attribute)
  3. ditto, but via the StyleCop checkin policy (if your TODOs are source comments)
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+1 for using checkin policy –  Vaccano Aug 31 '09 at 20:22
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Probably not the perfect solution, but Visual Studio let's you add TODO comments that may work well enough for you.

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The todo comments won't be a real solution as we're already using it to mark code segments which have to be reworked. We use it as a reminder for longterm tasks. And we have plenty of them so this might become a little bit unclear. –  Flo Aug 26 '09 at 12:40
    
You can use a different tag than TODO. If you go to Options -> Environment -> Task List you can add new tags. One could be Pre-Build. –  Ryan Aug 27 '09 at 12:46
    
@Ryan- that's a good suggestion. @Flo- I tend to use the ObsoleteAttribute a lot when reworking code- msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.obsoleteattribute.aspx –  RichardOD Aug 27 '09 at 19:17
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You could write a unit test that fails when the hardcoded stuff is found. Obviously, you won't get a reminder before checking in but you do get a build failure afterwards.

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