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I am facing an issue regarding the result set pointer movement when I call res.next() while I was debugging in eclipse IDE.

code:

   query="Select * from emp"
    res=stmt.executeQuery(query);
    System.out.println("Statement executed");
    System.out.println("-----------------------");
    int count=0;
    while(res.next()){
    count++;
    //some useful code
    }

the query executions returns two records. so I run the program normally, the count value will be 2 after the while loop ends which is the desired result but when I try to debug the same code in eclipse the count value remains 0 after the while loop ends, which means control is not entering the while loop, but am sure that there are 2 records in the table. What would be the problem here?

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4  
"but am sure that there are 2 records in the table" - too sure. Believe the debugger; doubt yourself. Perhaps you aren't connected to the right database. Lots of other things could be wrong. –  duffymo Nov 12 '12 at 10:12

1 Answer 1

I found out the reason.

I had a debug expression as res.next(); so each time I press F6(key to goto next statement in eclipse debug mode), the statement was getting executed so by the time I come to while loop the statement was executed thrice, causing the actual result set pointer itself to move to after last position.

The reason why I had res.next() in debug mode was to check if it returns true or not.

We need to be cautious when we add the expression in debug mode. Not only the above statements, but also statements like pre-increment or a post-increment or any expression which would assign a new value to the variables, because the debug expression actually acts in the actual variables what we have in our program.

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