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How can 2 unsorted text files of different lengths be display side by side (in columns) in a shell

Given one.txt and two.txt:

$ cat one.txt
apple
pear
longer line than the last two
last line

$ cat two.txt
The quick brown fox..
foo
bar 
linux

skipped a line

Display:

apple                               The quick brown fox..
pear                                foo
longer line than the last two       bar 
last line                           linux

                                    skipped a line

paste one.txt two.txt almost does the trick but doesn't align the columns nicely as it just prints one tab between column 1 and 2. I know how to this with emacs and vim but want the output displayed to stdout for piping ect.

The solution I came up with uses sdiff and then pipes to sed to remove the output sdiff adds.

sdiff one.txt two.txt | sed -r 's/[<>|]//;s/(\t){3}//'

I could create a function and stick it in my .bashrc but surely a command for this exists already (or a cleaner solution potentially)?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 53 down vote accepted

You can use pr to do this, using the -m flag to merge the files, one per column, and -t to omit headers, eg.

pr -m -t one.txt two.txt

outputs:

apple                               The quick brown fox..
pear                                foo
longer line than the last two       bar
last line                           linux

                                    skipped a line
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7  
Perfect! Knew something would exist, never heard of pr before. I tried with 3 files and the output was truncated but the -w option solved that. Nice answer. –  iiSeymour Nov 12 '12 at 12:54
5  
@sudo_o: Happy to help, coreutils is full of gems –  Hasturkun Nov 12 '12 at 13:05
3  
Great with -w WIDTH option that helps in formatting it. –  20050 8519 21102 26896 16937 Jan 28 at 16:23
1  
Is there a way for pr to auto-detect screen width? –  Matt Apr 11 at 18:59
1  
@Matt: You could use $COLUMNS, which should be provided by the shell. –  Hasturkun Aug 11 at 15:38
paste one.txt two.txt | awk -F'\t' '{
    if (length($1)>max1) {max1=length($1)};
    col1[NR] = $1; col2[NR] = $2 }
    END {for (i = 1; i<=NR; i++) {printf ("%-*s     %s\n", max1, col1[i], col2[i])}
}'

Using * in a format specification allows you to supply the field length dynamically.

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It works but I wouldn't call this a cleaner solution :| –  iiSeymour Nov 12 '12 at 10:57
1  
cleaner != shorter –  Barmar Nov 12 '12 at 11:07
    
Never said it did, but if I want to display two files side by side occasionally then doing diff -y one.txt two.txt does a better job than paste one.txt two.txt and removing diffs extra chars that are displayed with sed is trivial comparing with writing/remembering an awk script. Even with both as functions in .bash_rc longer != better, more readable, faster.. what is the advantage here? –  iiSeymour Nov 12 '12 at 11:52

remove dynamically field length counting from Barmar's answer will make it a much shorter command....but you still need at least one script to finish the work which could not be avoided no matter what method you choose.

paste one.txt two.txt |awk -F'\t' '{printf("%-50s %s\n",$1,$2)}'
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There is a sed way:

f1width=$(wc -L <one.txt)
f1blank="$(printf "%${f1width}s" "")"
paste one.txt two.txt |
    sed "
        s/^\(.*\)\t/\1$f1blank\t/;
        s/^\(.\{$f1width\}\) *\t/\1 /;
    "

(Of course @Hasturkun 's solution pr is the most accurate!):

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To expand a bit on @Hasturkun's answer: by default pr uses only 72 columns for its output, but it's relatively easy to make it use all available columns of your terminal window:

pr -w $COLUMNS -m -t one.txt two.txt

Most shell's will store (and update) your terminal's screenwidth in the $COLUMNS environment variable, so we're just passing that value on to pr to use for its output's width setting.

This also answers @Matt's question:

Is there a way for pr to auto-detect screen width?

So, no: pr itself can't detect the screenwidth, but we're helping out a bit by passing in the terminal's width via the -w option.

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diff -y <file1> <file2>


[root /]# cat /one.txt
apple
pear
longer line than the last two
last line
[root /]# cat /two.txt
The quick brown fox..
foo
bar
linux
[root@RHEL6-64 /]# diff -y one.txt two.txt
apple                                                         | The quick brown fox..
pear                                                          | foo
longer line than the last two                                 | bar
last line                                                     | linux
share|improve this answer
    
sdiff is diff -y which I discuss in the question. –  iiSeymour Jan 1 at 12:10
    
Yes right... it was mentioned to show another command/flag setting of doing it. –  iAdhyan Jan 2 at 5:54
    
But it doesn't answer the questions diff adds characters between the two files. –  iiSeymour Jan 2 at 13:49

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